boughten

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

boughten

  1. (archaic or regional, chiefly US) Having been purchased or bought (rather than homemade).
    Is that a boughten chair?
    • 1933, Laura Ingalls Wilder, Farmer Boy, Harper (1971), ISBN 978-0-06-440003-9, page 86:
      Poor people had to wear homespun on Sundays, and Royal and Almanzo wore fullcloth. But Father and Mother and the girls were very fine, in clothes that Mother had made of store-boughten cloth, woven by machines.
    • 1954, Beverly Cleary, Henry and Ribsy, 2001 1st Scholastic edition, ISBN 0-439-38595-4, page 113:
      (After the children's mothers cut their hair): "It's all right for you guys to laugh. You're in the same room at school and you can stick together, but I'll be the only one in my room who doesn't have a boughten haircut."
    • 1967, Beverly Cleary, Mitch and Amy, 2009 HarperCollins edition, ISBN 9780688108069, page 17:
      "Did you build it all by yourself?" []
      "I have a boughten one at home," said Mitchell, indignant at the way he was being treated. "I just wanted to see if I could make one that would work."

VerbEdit

boughten

  1. (archaic or regional, chiefly US) past participle of buy
    He has boughten that brand of cereal before.
Last modified on 2 July 2013, at 13:32