See also: caleche

English Edit

 

Alternative forms Edit

Etymology Edit

Borrowed from French calèche, from Slavic diminutive of ‘wheel’ (compare Russian коляска (koljaska), Polish kolasa).

Pronunciation Edit

Noun Edit

calèche (plural calèches)

  1. A type of carriage with low wheels, especially pulled by horses.
    Coordinate terms: berlin, landau
    • 1834, L[etitia] E[lizabeth] L[andon], chapter XXI, in Francesca Carrara. [], volume I, London: Richard Bentley, [], (successor to Henry Colburn), →OCLC, page 251:
      Francesca promised, and the Queen advancing towards the calèche, hastily followed her. The carriage drove off; though not till Anne had given Voiture a most gracious smile, and bid him remember the verses.
    • 1918, Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina, tr. Louise & Aylmer Maude (Oxford 1998, p. 179)
      He laughed merrily, showing his compact row of teeth, and drawing his cap over the bald patch, went out and got into the calèche.
    • 1927, Emma Orczy, Sir Percy Hits Back[1]:
      All that she knew--and this was comforting--was that soon they would all be starting for home: not in a crowded, jostling old coche, but in a calèche. What a wonderful man Bibi was: so grand and powerful and rich, that he had a calèche of his own and could come and go as he pleased.

Translations Edit

Dutch Edit

Etymology Edit

Borrowed from French calèche.

Pronunciation Edit

  • IPA(key): /kaːˈlɛʃ/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ca‧lè‧che

Noun Edit

calèche f (plural calèches)

  1. light, four-wheeled, horse-drawn open carriage with a low wheelbase and a large distance between front and rear axles
  2. (historical) wide bonnet

French Edit

Etymology Edit

From Slavic (compare Russian коляска (koljaska)).

Pronunciation Edit

Noun Edit

calèche f (plural calèches)

  1. calèche, carriage

Further reading Edit