calendrical

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

calendar +‎ -ical

AdjectiveEdit

calendrical (not comparable)

  1. Of, pertaining to, or used by a calendar system.
    • 2009, Fred S. Kleine, Gardner's Art Through the Ages: A Global History, Thomson Wadsworth (2009), ISBN 9780495093077, page 371:
      Although other ancient Mesoamerican societies, even in the Preclassic period, also possessed calendars, only the Maya calendar can be translated directly into today's calendrical system.
    • 2011, Elisheva Carlebach, Palaces of Time: Jewish Calendar and Culture in Early Modern Europe, Belknap Press (2011), ISBN 9780674052543, page 47:
      This growing focus on calendrical matters in early modern Europe paralleled, and in some measure directly influenced, a renewed interest among Jews in their own calendar.
    • 2011, Erik Harms, Saigon's Edge: On the Margins of Ho Chi Minh City, University of Minnesota Press (2011), ISBN 9780816656059, page 101:
      In Vietnam, the calendrical system of "heavenly stems and earthly branches" sounds quite mystical and foreign, but this lunar calendar can in fact be translated quite simply into a Western calendar year with a formula and a chart.

SynonymsEdit

  • (of, pertaining to, or used by a calendar system): calendric

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Last modified on 13 December 2013, at 18:46