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See also: Camus

Contents

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

camus

  1. Obsolete form of camis.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Origin uncertain.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

camus m (feminine singular camuse, masculine plural camus, feminine plural camuses)

  1. flat-nosed

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Likely derived from Ancient Greek, compare Doric Ancient Greek κᾱμός (kāmós), Attic Ancient Greek κημός (kēmós, muzzle, nose-bag; face-mask; a female ornament).

NounEdit

cāmus m (genitive cāmī); second declension

  1. A kind of collar for the neck; necklace (Can we verify(+) this sense?)
  2. (Late Latin) collar, muzzle (as for a horse)

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative cāmus cāmī
genitive cāmī cāmōrum
dative cāmō cāmīs
accusative cāmum cāmōs
ablative cāmō cāmīs
vocative cāme cāmī

ReferencesEdit

  • camus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • camus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • camus” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • camus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • camus in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin