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EnglishEdit

 
the spice sumac

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French sumac, from Medieval Latin sumach, from Arabic سُمَّاق(summāq), from Classical Syriac ܣܘܡܩܐ(summāqāʾ, red; sumac).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sumac (usually uncountable, plural sumacs)

  1. Any of various shrubs or small trees of the genus Rhus and other genera in Anacardiaceae.
    • 1957, J. D. Salinger, "Zooey", in, 1961, Franny and Zooey:
      There was a Steinway grand piano [] a cherrywood writing table, and an assortment of floor lamps, table lamps, and "bridge" lamps that sprang up all over the congested inscape like sumac.
  2. A sour spice popular in the Eastern Mediterranean, made from the berries of tanner's sumac (Rhus coriaria).

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sumac m (plural sumacs)

  1. sumac (tree)
  2. sumac (spice)

Further readingEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

sumac m (oblique plural sumas, nominative singular sumas, nominative plural sumac)

  1. sumac
    • 1377, Bernard de Gordon, Fleur de lis de medecine (a.k.a. lilium medicine), page 131-132 of this essay:
      et couvrir par quelconque cause que soit ou par sumac, ou par galles, ou par galbanum, ou par baing d’eaue froide, ou de vive, ou semblables.

DescendantsEdit