EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French cession, from Latin cessionem, from past participle of cēdere (to yield).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cession (countable and uncountable, plural cessions)

  1. That which is ceded. Insurance: (part of) a risk which is transferred from one actor to another.
    The reinsurance company accepted a 25% cession from the direct insurer.
  2. The giving up of rights, property etc. which one is entitled to.
    • 1817, Walter Scott, Rob Roy, X:
      ‘Rashleigh, whose occasions frequently call him elsewhere, has generously made a cession of his rights in my favour; so that I now endeavour to prosecute alone the studies in which he used formerly to be my guide.’

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AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cessiō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cession f (plural cessions)

  1. cession

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

cession c

  1. cession, bankruptcy

DeclensionEdit

Declension of cession 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative cession cessionen cessioner cessionerna
Genitive cessions cessionens cessioners cessionernas

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See alsoEdit