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EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French chancel.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

chancel (plural chancels)

  1. The space around the altar in a church, often enclosed, for use by the clergy and the choir. In medieval cathedrals the chancel was usually enclosed or blocked off from the nave by an altar screen.
    • 1577, Raphaell Holinshed; Richard Stanihurst, “[The Historie of Irelande.] The Thirde Booke of the Historie of Ireland, Comprising the Raigne of Henry the Eyght: [...].”, in The Firste Volume of the Chronicles of England, Scotlande, and Irelande [], volume I, London: Imprinted [by Henry Bynneman] for Iohn Harrison, OCLC 55195564, pages 77–78, column 2:
      The Citizens in their rage, imagining that euery poſt in the Churche had bin one of ye Souldyers, ſhot habbe or nabbe at randon[sic, meaning random] uppe to the Roode lofte, and to the Chancell, leauing ſome of theyr arrowes ſticking in the Images.
    • 1907, Harold Bindloss, chapter 20, in The Dust of Conflict[1]:
      Hester Earle and Violet Wayne were moving about the aisle with bundles of wheat-ears and streamers of ivy, for the harvest thanksgiving was shortly to be celebrated, while the vicar stood waiting for their directions on the chancel steps with a great handful of crimson gladioli.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French chancel, from Latin cancellus.

NounEdit

chancel m (plural chancels)

  1. chancel

Further readingEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cancellus.

NounEdit

chancel m (oblique plural chanceaus or chanceax or chanciaus or chanciax or chancels, nominative singular chanceaus or chanceax or chanciaus or chanciax or chancels, nominative plural chancel)

  1. chancel

DescendantsEdit