Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French chancel.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

chancel ‎(plural chancels)

  1. The space around the altar in a church, often enclosed, for use by the clergy and the choir. In medieval cathedrals the chancel was usually enclosed or blocked off from the nave by an altar screen.
    • 1907, Harold Bindloss, chapter 20, in The Dust of Conflict[1]:
      Hester Earle and Violet Wayne were moving about the aisle with bundles of wheat-ears and streamers of ivy, for the harvest thanksgiving was shortly to be celebrated, while the vicar stood waiting for their directions on the chancel steps with a great handful of crimson gladioli.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cancellus.

NounEdit

chancel m ‎(plural chancels)

  1. chancel

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cancellus.

NounEdit

chancel m ‎(oblique plural chanceaus or chanceax or chanciaus or chanciax or chancels, nominative singular chanceaus or chanceax or chanciaus or chanciax or chancels, nominative plural chancel)

  1. chancel

DescendantsEdit