See also: Nave, näve, nāve, nāvē, and navé

EnglishEdit

 
The nave of a church in Ellmau, Austria

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Ultimately from Latin nāvis, via a Romance source. Doublet of nef and nau.

NounEdit

nave (plural naves)

  1. (architecture) The middle or body of a church, extending from the transepts to the principal entrances.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 5, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      Then everybody once more knelt, and soon the blessing was pronounced. The choir and the clergy trooped out slowly, […], down the nave to the western door. […] At a seemingly immense distance the surpliced group stopped to say the last prayer.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English nave, from Old English nafu, from Proto-Germanic *nabō (compare Dutch naaf, German Nabe, Swedish nav), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃nebʰ- (navel) (compare Latin umbō (shield boss), Latvian naba, Sanskrit नभ्य (nabhya)).

NounEdit

nave (plural naves)

  1. A hub of a wheel.
    • 1599-1601, William Shakespeare, Hamlet, Act II, Scene 2
      'Out, out, thou strumpet Fortune! All you gods,
      In general synod take away her power;
      Break all the spokes and fellies from her wheel,
      And bowl the round nave down the hill of heaven...
  2. (obsolete) The navel.
    • 1606, William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, scene 1:
      Till he faced the slave; / Which ne'er shook hands, nor bade farewell to him, / Till he unseam'd him from the nave to the chaps, / And fix'd his head upon our battlements
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nāvis, nāvem.

NounEdit

nave f (plural naves)

  1. ship

AuluaEdit

NounEdit

nave

  1. water
    • (Can we date this quote?) Martin Pavior-Smith, Exploring self-concept and narrator characterisation in Aulua (nave):
      Nave ibtavov ben.
      The water went [=was swept] out [of the house].

Further readingEdit

  • Darrell T. Tryon, New Hebrides languages: an internal classification (1976) (na-βʷe); ABVD 1 (na-fe), 2 (na-ve), 3 (na-ve)

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese, from Latin nāvis, nāvem.

NounEdit

nave f (plural naves)

  1. ship (watercraft or airship)
  2. (architecture) nave

Related termsEdit


InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

nave (plural naves)

  1. ship

ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nāvem, accusative of nāvis, from Proto-Italic *naus ~ *nāwis, from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂us, derived from the root *(s)neh₂- (to swim, float).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nave f (plural navi)

  1. ship

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Slavomolisano: nava

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

nāve

  1. ablative singular of navis

ReferencesEdit

  • nave in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • nave in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • nave in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English nafu, from Proto-West Germanic *nabu, from Proto-Germanic *nabō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nave (plural naves)

  1. nave (hub of a wheel)

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Northern SamiEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈnave/

VerbEdit

nave

  1. inflection of navvit:
    1. present indicative connegative
    2. second-person singular imperative
    3. imperative connegative

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese nave, from Latin nāvis, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂us. Doublet of nau.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): (Brazil) /ˈna.vi/, [ˈna.vi]
  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /ˈna.vɨ/, [ˈna.vɨ]

NounEdit

nave f (plural naves)

  1. ship
    Synonyms: barco, navio
  2. (architecture) nave, aisle
  3. (Brazil, slang) car

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hnefi.

NounEdit

nave (plural naves)

  1. (Orkney) a clenched fist or a handful
    ah'll cheust tak a nave-filI'll just take a handful
    He wis rorrin' and shaftin' his navehe was shouting and shaking his fist

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish naf, naue, from Latin nāvis, nāvem (whence English navigate and navy), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂us. Cognate with English nave.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈnabe/, [ˈna.β̞e]
  • (file)

NounEdit

nave f (plural naves)

  1. ship, vessel (with a concave hull)
    Synonyms: bajel, barco, buque, navío, nao
  2. craft, spaceship, spacecraft (ellipsis of nave espacial), starship (ellipsis of nave estelar)
  3. (architecture, religion) nave, aisle

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit