See also: Nave, näve, nāve, nāvē, and navé

EnglishEdit

 
The nave of a church in Ellmau, Austria

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Ultimately from Latin nāvem, singular accusative of nāvis, possibly via a Romance source. Doublet of nef and nau.

NounEdit

nave (plural naves)

  1. (architecture) The middle or body of a church, extending from the transepts to the principal entrances.
    • 1918, W[illiam] B[abington] Maxwell, chapter V, in The Mirror and the Lamp, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 4293071:
      Then everybody once more knelt, and soon the blessing was pronounced. The choir and the clergy trooped out slowly, [] , down the nave to the western door. [] At a seemingly immense distance the surpliced group stopped to say the last prayer.
  2. (architecture) The ground-level middle cavity of a barn.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English nave, from Old English nafu, from Proto-West Germanic *nabu, from Proto-Germanic *nabō (compare Dutch naaf, German Nabe, Swedish nav), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃nebʰ- (navel) (compare Latin umbō (shield boss), Latvian naba, Sanskrit नभ्य (nabhya)).

NounEdit

nave (plural naves)

  1. A hub of a wheel.
  2. (obsolete) The navel.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nāvis, nāvem.

NounEdit

nave f (plural naves)

  1. ship

AuluaEdit

NounEdit

nave

  1. water
    • (Can we date this quote?) Martin Pavior-Smith, Exploring self-concept and narrator characterisation in Aulua (nave):
      Nave ibtavov ben.
      The water went [=was swept] out [of the house].

Further readingEdit

  • Darrell T. Tryon, New Hebrides languages: an internal classification (1976) (na-βʷe); ABVD 1 (na-fe), 2 (na-ve), 3 (na-ve)

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese, from Latin nāvis, nāvem.

NounEdit

nave f (plural naves)

  1. ship (watercraft or airship)
  2. (architecture) nave

Related termsEdit


InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

nave (plural naves)

  1. ship

ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nāvem, accusative of nāvis, from Proto-Italic *naus ~ *nāwis, from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂us, derived from the root *(s)neh₂- (to swim, float).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nave f (plural navi)

  1. ship

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Slavomolisano: nava

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

nāve

  1. ablative singular of navis

ReferencesEdit

  • nave”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • nave”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • nave in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English nafu, from Proto-West Germanic *nabu, from Proto-Germanic *nabō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nave (plural naves)

  1. nave (hub of a wheel)

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Northern SamiEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈnave/

VerbEdit

nave

  1. inflection of navvit:
    1. present indicative connegative
    2. second-person singular imperative
    3. imperative connegative

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese nave, from Latin nāvis, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂us. Doublet of nau.

PronunciationEdit

 

NounEdit

nave f (plural naves)

  1. ship
    Synonyms: barco, navio
  2. (architecture) nave, aisle
  3. (Brazil, slang) car

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hnefi.

NounEdit

nave (plural naves)

  1. (Orkney) a clenched fist or a handful
    ah'll cheust tak a nave-filI'll just take a handful
    He wis rorrin' and shaftin' his navehe was shouting and shaking his fist

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish naf~naue, from Latin nāvem, nāvis, from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂us. Cognate with English nave, navigate, and navy.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈnabe/, [ˈna.β̞e]
  • (file)

NounEdit

nave f (plural naves)

  1. ship, vessel (with a concave hull)
    Synonyms: bajel, barco, buque, navío, nao
  2. craft, spaceship, spacecraft (ellipsis of nave espacial), starship (ellipsis of nave estelar)
  3. (architecture, religion) nave, aisle

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit