circulation

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English circulacioun, from Latin circulatio. Morphologically circulate +‎ -ion

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

circulation (countable and uncountable, plural circulations)

  1. The act of moving in a circle, or in a course which brings the moving body to the place where its motion began.
  2. The act of passing from place to place or person to person; free diffusion; transmission.
    • 1962 October, Brian Haresnape, “Focus on B.R. passenger stations”, in Modern Railways, page 252:
      For example, by changing the use of existing rooms, removing or replacing unsightly features, clearing obstacles to easy circulation, rearranging direction signs and generally introducing as much order as possible, most outdated station buildings can be made reasonably efficient and attractive.
  3. Currency; circulating coins; notes, bills, etc., current for coin.
    The new bills will come into circulation next Friday.
  4. The extent to which anything circulates or is circulated; the measurement of diffusion
    • June 1 2016, Karen Roberts in the Evening Express, Aberdeen Journals - The Broad Street Years
      The reputation and circulation of the paper continued to grow, and the board decided a new custom-built base was required for both the Press and Journal and Evening Express to replace the crumbling, but much loved, Broad Street offices.
  5. The movement of the blood in the circulatory system, by which it is brought into close relations with almost every living elementary constituent.
  6. The movement of the sap in the vessels and tissues of plants.

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin circulatio.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

circulation f (plural circulations)

  1. circulation (act of moving in a circular shape)
  2. (anatomy) circulation (of blood)
  3. traffic
  4. distribution, circulation (of a newspaper/magazine)

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