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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin clāmor (a shout, cry), from clāmō (cry out, complain)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

clamour (countable and uncountable, plural clamours)

  1. Britain and Canada spelling of clamor
    • Chaucer (Wife of Bath's Tale)
      Ffor which oppression was swich clamour
    • Shakespeare (Love's Labours Lost)
      Sickly eares Deaft with the clamours of their owne deare grones.
    • Addison
      Here the loud Arno's boist'rous clamours cease.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Macaulay to this entry?)

VerbEdit

clamour (third-person singular simple present clamours, present participle clamouring, simple past and past participle clamoured)

  1. Britain and Canada spelling of clamor
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To salute loudly.
    • Milton
      The people with a shout / Rifted the air, clamouring their god with praise.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To stun with noise.
    • Bacon
      Let them not come..in a Tribunitious Manner; For that is, to clamour Counsels, not to enforme them.
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To repeat the strokes quickly on (bells) so as to produce a loud clang.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bishop Warburton to this entry?)

Derived termsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Anglo-Norman clamour, from an earlier clamur, from Latin clamor

NounEdit

clamour (plural clamours)

  1. shout; cry; clamor

SynonymsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

clamour f (oblique plural clamours, nominative singular clamour, nominative plural clamours)

  1. Late Anglo-Norman spelling of clamur
    querele oie ne pleinte ne clamour