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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French clystere, or its source, Latin clyster, from Ancient Greek κλυστήρ (klustḗr).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

clyster (plural clysters)

  1. (now rare) A medicine applied via the rectum; an enema or suppository.
    • 1621, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy, Oxford: Printed by Iohn Lichfield and Iames Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 216894069; The Anatomy of Melancholy: What It Is. With All the Kindes, Cavses, Symptomes, Prognosticks, and Seuerall Cvres of It. In Three Maine Partitions, with Their Seuerall Sections, Members, and Svbsections. Philosophically, Medicinally, Historically Opened and Cut Up, by Democritvs Iunior, with a Satyricall Preface, Conducing to the Following Discourse, 2nd corrected and augmented edition, Oxford: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, 1624, OCLC 54573970, (please specify |partition=1, 2, or 3):
      , vol.I, New York 2001, p.233-4:
      Cnelius a physician being sent for, found his costiveness alone to be the cause, and thereupon gave him a clyster, by which he was speedily recovered.