EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from New Latin rectum, clipping of Latin rectum intestinum (literally the straight intestine), rectum, neuter of rectus (straight). See right.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹɛktəm/
  • (file)

NounEdit

rectum (plural recta or rectums)

  1. (anatomy) The terminal part of the large intestine through which feces pass after exiting the colon, but before leaving the body through the anus.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin rectum (intestīnum) (straight intestine).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rectum m (plural rectums)

  1. (anatomy) rectum

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

rēctum

  1. accusative supine of regō

ParticipleEdit

rēctum

  1. nominative neuter singular of rēctus
  2. accusative masculine singular of rēctus
  3. accusative neuter singular of rēctus
  4. vocative neuter singular of rēctus

ReferencesEdit

  • rectum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • rectum in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • rectum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) in a straight line: recta (regione, via); in directum
    • (ambiguous) you were right in...; you did right to..: recte, bene fecisti quod...
    • (ambiguous) a good conscience: conscientia recta, recte facti (factorum), virtutis, bene actae vitae, rectae voluntatis
    • (ambiguous) to congratulate oneself on one's clear conscience: conscientia recte factorum erigi
    • (ambiguous) quite rightly: et recte (iure, merito)
    • (ambiguous) quite rightly: et recte (iure) quidem
    • (ambiguous) quite rightly: recte, iure id quidem