Contents

LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From petō (I seek).

NounEdit

compitum n (genitive compitī); second declension

  1. (chiefly in the plural) crossroads

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative compitum compita
genitive compitī compitōrum
dative compitō compitīs
accusative compitum compita
ablative compitō compitīs
vocative compitum compita

ReferencesEdit

  • compitum in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • compitum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • compitum” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • Hercules at the cross-roads, between virtue and vice: Hercules in trivio, in bivio, in compitis