damnable

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English dampnable, from Old French dampnable, from Latin damnābilis; surface analysis damn +‎ -able.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

damnable (comparative more damnable, superlative most damnable)

  1. Capable of being damned.
  2. Deserving of damnation; very bad.
    That damnable fridge has stopped working again.
    • 1926, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Land of Mist[1]:
      Great God! They were moving! They were rushing swiftly and noiselessly downwards! Black, black as night, huge, ill-defined, semi-human and altogether evil and damnable.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French dampnable, from Latin damnābilis; surface analysis damner +‎ -able.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

damnable (plural damnables)

  1. damnable