See also: Datura

EnglishEdit

 
datura plant
 
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EtymologyEdit

From the genus name.

NounEdit

datura (plural daturas)

  1. A plant of the genus Datura, known for its trumpet-shaped flowers and poisonous properties. [from 16th c.]
    • 1621, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy, Oxford: Printed by Iohn Lichfield and Iames Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 216894069; The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd corrected and augmented edition, Oxford: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, 1624, OCLC 54573970, partition 2, section 5, member 1, subsection 5:
      Garcias ab Horto [...] makes mention of an herb called datura, “which, if it be eaten for twenty-four hours following, takes away all sense of grief, makes them incline to laughter and mirth” [...].
    • 1895, Rudyard Kipling, “The King’s Ankus”, in The Second Jungle Book, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., OCLC 637556, page 188:
      "Apple of Death" is what the Jungle call thorn-apple or dhatura, the readiest poison in all India.
    • 1985, Wade Davis, The Serpent and the Rainbow, Simon & Schuster, p. 37:
      Datura did grow in Haiti, three species, all of them introduced from the Old World.
    • 2008, Amitav Ghosh, Sea of Poppies, Penguin 2015, p. 38:
      It was a decoction of datura that wrung the truth from the old woman, by sending her into a trance from which she never recovered.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

datura f (plural dature)

  1. thorn apple (of genus Datura)

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

datūra

  1. nominative feminine singular of datūrus
  2. nominative neuter plural of datūrus
  3. accusative neuter plural of datūrus
  4. vocative feminine singular of datūrus
  5. vocative neuter plural of datūrus

ParticipleEdit

datūrā

  1. ablative feminine singular of datūrus

ReferencesEdit