See also: Genus, ĝenus, and -genus

English edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin genus (birth, origin, a race, sort, kind) from the root gen- in Latin gignō (to beget, produce). Doublet of gender, genre, and kin.

Pronunciation edit

  • (UK) enPR: jēn’-əs, jĕn’-əs, IPA(key): /ˈdʒiːnəs/, /ˈdʒɛnəs/
  • (US) enPR: jēn’-əs, IPA(key): /ˈd͡ʒiːnəs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːnəs

Noun edit

genus (plural genera or (both nonstandard) genuses or genusses)

  1. (biology, taxonomy) A category in the classification of organisms, ranking below family (Lat. familia) and above species.
    All magnolias belong to the genus Magnolia.
    Other species of the genus Bos are often called cattle or wild cattle.
    There are only two genera and species of seadragons.
    • 1992, Rudolf M[athias] Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, New York, N.Y.: Columbia University Press, →ISBN, page 6:
      Müller [] criticized the division of the "Jubuleae" into two families and he cited Jubula as an annectant genus.
    1. A taxon at this rank.
  2. A group with common attributes.
    • 1945, Bertrand Russell, A History of Western Philosophy, page 655:
      Recollection is one of a whole genus of effects which are more or less peculiar to the phenomena that we naturally call "mental."
  3. (topology, graph theory, algebraic geometry) A natural number representing any of several related measures of the complexity of a given manifold or graph.
  4. (semantics) Within a definition, a broader category of the defined concept.
  5. (music) A type of tuning or intonation, used within an Ancient Greek tetrachord.

Usage notes edit

Synonyms edit

Hyponyms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Danish edit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin genus.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɡeːnus/, [ˈɡ̊eːnus]

Noun edit

genus n (plural indefinite genus or genera)

  1. (biology, taxonomy) genus
    Synonym: slægt
  2. (grammar) gender
    Synonym: køn

Further reading edit

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin genus.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɣeː.nʏs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ge‧nus

Noun edit

genus n (plural genera)

  1. (botany) a rank in a taxonomic classification, in between family and species.
    Synonym: geslacht
  2. (botany) a taxon at this rank
    Synonym: geslacht
  3. (linguistics) gender
    Synonym: geslacht

Derived terms edit

Finnish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin genus.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡenus/, [ˈɡe̞nus̠]
  • Rhymes: -enus
  • Syllabification(key): ge‧nus

Noun edit

genus

  1. (botany) Synonym of suku (genus)
  2. (topology) genus
    Synonym: suku

Declension edit

Inflection of genus (Kotus type 39/vastaus, no gradation)
nominative genus genukset
genitive genuksen genusten
genuksien
partitive genusta genuksia
illative genukseen genuksiin
singular plural
nominative genus genukset
accusative nom. genus genukset
gen. genuksen
genitive genuksen genusten
genuksien
partitive genusta genuksia
inessive genuksessa genuksissa
elative genuksesta genuksista
illative genukseen genuksiin
adessive genuksella genuksilla
ablative genukselta genuksilta
allative genukselle genuksille
essive genuksena genuksina
translative genukseksi genuksiksi
abessive genuksetta genuksitta
instructive genuksin
comitative See the possessive forms below.
Possessive forms of genus (Kotus type 39/vastaus, no gradation)
first-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative genukseni genukseni
accusative nom. genukseni genukseni
gen. genukseni
genitive genukseni genusteni
genuksieni
partitive genustani genuksiani
inessive genuksessani genuksissani
elative genuksestani genuksistani
illative genukseeni genuksiini
adessive genuksellani genuksillani
ablative genukseltani genuksiltani
allative genukselleni genuksilleni
essive genuksenani genuksinani
translative genuksekseni genuksikseni
abessive genuksettani genuksittani
instructive
comitative genuksineni
second-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative genuksesi genuksesi
accusative nom. genuksesi genuksesi
gen. genuksesi
genitive genuksesi genustesi
genuksiesi
partitive genustasi genuksiasi
inessive genuksessasi genuksissasi
elative genuksestasi genuksistasi
illative genukseesi genuksiisi
adessive genuksellasi genuksillasi
ablative genukseltasi genuksiltasi
allative genuksellesi genuksillesi
essive genuksenasi genuksinasi
translative genukseksesi genuksiksesi
abessive genuksettasi genuksittasi
instructive
comitative genuksinesi
first-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative genuksemme genuksemme
accusative nom. genuksemme genuksemme
gen. genuksemme
genitive genuksemme genustemme
genuksiemme
partitive genustamme genuksiamme
inessive genuksessamme genuksissamme
elative genuksestamme genuksistamme
illative genukseemme genuksiimme
adessive genuksellamme genuksillamme
ablative genukseltamme genuksiltamme
allative genuksellemme genuksillemme
essive genuksenamme genuksinamme
translative genukseksemme genuksiksemme
abessive genuksettamme genuksittamme
instructive
comitative genuksinemme
second-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative genuksenne genuksenne
accusative nom. genuksenne genuksenne
gen. genuksenne
genitive genuksenne genustenne
genuksienne
partitive genustanne genuksianne
inessive genuksessanne genuksissanne
elative genuksestanne genuksistanne
illative genukseenne genuksiinne
adessive genuksellanne genuksillanne
ablative genukseltanne genuksiltanne
allative genuksellenne genuksillenne
essive genuksenanne genuksinanne
translative genukseksenne genuksiksenne
abessive genuksettanne genuksittanne
instructive
comitative genuksinenne
third-person possessor
singular plural
nominative genuksensa genuksensa
accusative nom. genuksensa genuksensa
gen. genuksensa
genitive genuksensa genustensa
genuksiensa
partitive genustaan
genustansa
genuksiaan
genuksiansa
inessive genuksessaan
genuksessansa
genuksissaan
genuksissansa
elative genuksestaan
genuksestansa
genuksistaan
genuksistansa
illative genukseensa genuksiinsa
adessive genuksellaan
genuksellansa
genuksillaan
genuksillansa
ablative genukseltaan
genukseltansa
genuksiltaan
genuksiltansa
allative genukselleen
genuksellensa
genuksilleen
genuksillensa
essive genuksenaan
genuksenansa
genuksinaan
genuksinansa
translative genuksekseen
genukseksensa
genuksikseen
genuksiksensa
abessive genuksettaan
genuksettansa
genuksittaan
genuksittansa
instructive
comitative genuksineen
genuksinensa

Latin edit

 
Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Italic *genos, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵénh₁os n (race), from the root *ǵenh₁- (to produce, beget); compare also gēns, gignō and -gnus, from the same root. Cognates include Ancient Greek γένος (génos, race, stock, kin, kind), Sanskrit जनस् (jánas, race, class of beings), Proto-Celtic *genos (birth; family), and English kin. Doublet of genea.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

genus n (genitive generis); third declension

  1. birth, origin, lineage, descent
  2. kind, type, class
    • 27 BCE – 25 BCE, Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita 26.1:
      huic generi militum senatus eundem, quem Cannensibus, finem statuerat militiae.
      For this class of soldier the senate had established a limit in duration to their military service, which was the same as the men at Cannae.
  3. species (of animal or plant), race (of people)
    • c. 37 BCE – 30 BCE, Virgil, Georgics III:
      omne adeo genus in terris hominumque ferarumque
      et genus aequoreum pecudes pictaeque volucres
      in furias ignemque ruunt
      So far does every species on earth of man and beast,
      whether the aquatic species, livestock, or painted-winged,
      collapse into the frenzies and the fire [of sex].
  4. set, group (with common attributes)
  5. (grammar) gender
    • 6th century, Magnus Aurelius Cassiodorus (attributed): Commentarium de oratione et de octo partibus orationis. In: „Patrologiae cursus completus sive Bibliotheca universalis, integra, uniformis, commoda, oeconomica, omnium ss. patrum, doctorum scriptorumque ecclesiasticorum qui ab aevo apostolico ad innocentii III tempora floruerunt; [] . Series prima, in qua prodeunt patres, doctores scriptoresque ecclesiae latinae a tertulliano ad gregorium magnum. Accurante J.-P. Migne, cursuum completorum in singulos scientiae ecclesiaticae ramos editore. Patrologiae tomus LXX. Cassiodori tomus posterior. – Magni Aurelii Cassiodori senatoris, viri patricii, consularis, et vivariensis abbatis opera omnia in duos tomos distributa, ad fidem manuscriptiorum codicum emendata et aucta, notis, observationibus et indicibus locupletata, praecedente auctoris vita, quae nunc primum in lucem prodit cum dissertatione de ejus monarchatu. Opera et studio J. Garetii monarchi ordinis sancti Benedicti e congregatione sancti mauri. Nobis autem curantibus accesserunt complexiones in epistolas b. Pauli quas edidit et annotavit scipio Maffeius. Tomus posterior. – Parisiis, venit apud editorem, in via dicta d'amboise, près la barriere d'enfer, ou petit-montrouge. 1847“, p. 1225
      Genera nominum sunt sex: masculinum, ut hic Cato; femininum, ut haec musa; neutrum, ut hoc monile; commune duorum generum, ut hic et haec sacerdos: trium generum, ut hic, et haec, et hoc felix; epicoenon, quod Latine promiscuum dicitur, ut passer, aquila.
      Nouns have six genders: masculine, e.g. hic Cato 'this man Cato'; feminine, e.g. haec musa 'this muse'; neuter, e.g. hoc monile 'this necklace'; common to two genders, e.g. hic et haec sacerdos 'this priest or priestess'; of three genders, e.g. hic, et haec, et hoc felix 'this lucky man, woman or thing'; epicene, called promiscous in Latin, e.g. passer 'sparrow', aquila 'eagle'.
    • 16th century, Andreas Semperius (a.k.a. Andreas Sampere, Andreu Sempere): Andreae Semperii Valentini Alcodiani, doctoris medici, prima grammaticae latinae institutio tribus libris explicata, Majorca/Mallorca, 1819, p.19
      Genera nominum, septem sunt. Masculinum, cui praeponitur hic: ut hic Dominus. Foemineum, cui praeponitur haec: ut haec musa. Neutrum, cui praeponuntur hoc: ut hoc templum. Commune, cui praeponuntur hic, & haec: ut hic, & haec Sacerdos. Omne, cui praeponuntur hic, haec, hoc, vel per tres varias voces inflectitur: ut hic, haec, hoc felix, bonus, bona, bonum. Dubium, quod modo masculinum, modo faemineum, apud Oratores etiam invenitur: ut hic, vel haec dies. Promiscuum, in quo sexus uterque per alterum apparet: ut hic passer, haec aquila, hic lepus.
      Nouns have seven genders. Masculine, which you can precede with hic: hic dominus 'this Lord'. Feminine, which you can precede with haec, e.g. haec musa 'this muse'. Neuter, which you can precede with hoc, e.g. hoc templum 'this temple'. Common, which you can precede with hic and haec: hic & haec sacerdos 'this male or female priest'. Universal, which you can precede with all three of hic, haec, hoc, or which vary in three forms, e.g. hic, haec, hoc felix 'this lucky man, woman, thing', hic bonus, haec bona, hoc bonum 'this good man, good woman, good thing'. Doubtful, which in the orators can be found to be sometimes masculine, sometimes feminine, e.g. hic, vel haec dies 'this day'. Promiscuous, in which a gender appears instead of another, e.g. hic passer 'this sparrow' (always masculine), haec aquila 'this eagle' (always feminine), hic lepus 'this rabbit' (always masculine).
  6. (grammar) subtype of word
    • Aelius Donatus, Ars Minor De Verbo:
      Genera verborum quot sunt? Quinque. Quae? Activa passiva neutra deponentia communia.
      How many types of verbs are there? Five. Which ones? Active, passive, neuter, deponent, common.
    • Maurus Servius Honoratus, Commentarius in Artem Donati :
      Verborum genera quinque sunt, activa passiva neutra communia deponentia.
      There are five types of verbs: active, passive, neuter, common, deponent.
Declension edit

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative genus genera
Genitive generis generum
Dative generī generibus
Accusative genus genera
Ablative genere generibus
Vocative genus genera
Hyponyms edit
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

genūs

  1. genitive singular of genū

References edit

  • genus”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • genus”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • genus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • an Englishman by birth: natione, genere Anglus
    • the position of the lower classes: condicio ac fortuna hominum infimi generis
    • from this point of view; similarly: quo in genere
    • from every point of view; looked at in every light: omni ex parte; in omni genere; omnibus rebus
    • to be engaged in any branch of study: in aliquo litterarum genere versari
    • the species is subordinate the genus: partes generibus subiectae sunt
    • to differ qualitatively not quantitatively: genere, non numero or magnitudine differre
    • this word is neuter: hoc vocabulum generis neutri (not neutrius) est)
    • to be of noble family: generis antiquitate florere
    • of illustrious family: nobili, honesto, illustri loco or genere natus
    • people of every rank: homines omnis generis
    • the aristocracy (as a social class): nobiles; nobilitas; qui nobilitate generis excellunt
    • (ambiguous) the male, female sex: sexus (not genus) virilis, muliebris
    • (ambiguous) to choose a career, profession: genus vitae (vivendi) or aetatis degendae deligere
    • (ambiguous) to analyse a general division into its specific parts: genus universum in species certas partiri et dividere (Or. 33. 117)
    • (ambiguous) to transplant to Rome one of the branches of poesy: poesis genus ad Romanos transferre
    • (ambiguous) style: genus dicendi (scribendi); oratio
    • (ambiguous) elevated, moderate, plain style: genus dicendi grave or grande, medium, tenue (cf. Or. 5. 20; 6. 21)
    • (ambiguous) a running style: fusum orationis genus
    • (ambiguous) a rough, unpolished style: inconditum dicendi genus (Brut. 69. 242)
    • (ambiguous) a bombastic style: inflatum orationis genus
    • (ambiguous) to adopt the language of everyday life: accedere ad cotidiani sermonis genus

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

 
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Etymology edit

From Latin genus.

Noun edit

genus m or n (definite singular genusen or genuset, indefinite plural genera or genus, definite plural genera or generaa or genusa or genusane)

  1. (biology, taxonomy) genus
  2. (grammar) gender
  3. (grammar) voice

References edit

Swedish edit

 
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Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin genus.

Noun edit

genus n

  1. (grammar) gender (division of nouns and pronouns)
  2. (social) gender, sex (social issues of being man or woman)

Usage notes edit

  • Biological gender is called kön. The Latin word genus is used for grammar and more recently for gender studies.

Declension edit

Declension of genus 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative genus genuset genus genusen
Genitive genus genusets genus genusens

Synonyms edit

Related terms edit

References edit

Anagrams edit