ScotsEdit

NounEdit

deevil (plural deevils)

  1. Alternative form of deil
    • 1881, Margaret O. (Wilson) Oliphant, The Open Door, and the Portrait.[1] (in English):
      If the deevil himsel was in the auld hoose, I have no interest in 't one way or another—" "Sandy, hold your peace!" cried his wife imperatively. "
    • 1912, O. Douglas, Olivia in India[2] (in English):
      The last I saw of her she had seized the khansamah's young assistant and was shouting at him, "Chokra—ye impident little black deevil, will you tell this moment, has there been an accident?"

YolaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English devel, from Old English dēofol.

NounEdit

deevil

  1. devil

ReferencesEdit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith