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IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish deil (a straight piece of wood in various applications).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

deil f (genitive singular deile, nominative plural deileanna)

  1. lathe (machine tool used to shape a piece of material)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

deil (present analytic deileann, future analytic deilfidh, verbal noun deileadh, past participle deilte)

  1. to turn, shape with a lathe

ConjugationEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
deil dheil ndeil
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

deil

  1. Alternative form of del

ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English devel, from Old English dēofol.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

deil (plural deils)

  1. devil
    • 1827, Sir Walter Scott, "The Highland Widow" ch. 2, in The Chronicles of the Canongate:
      Those in the Lowland line who lay near him, and desired to enjoy their lives and property in quiet, were contented to pay him a small composition, in name of protection money, and comforted themselves with the old proverb that it was better to "fleech the deil than fight him."

WelshEdit

VerbEdit

deil

  1. third-person singular present indicative/future of dal

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
deil ddeil neil unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.