Last modified on 7 December 2014, at 01:40

destrier

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman destrer, Old French destrier, from a Vulgar Latin derivative of Latin dextera, literally “(animal) led by the right hand”, from dexter (right).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɛstɹɪə/, /ˈdɛstɹiːeɪ/

NounEdit

destrier (plural destriers)

  1. A large warhorse, especially of a medieval knight.
    • 1819, I am resolved to share or avert the danger; which, that I may the better do, I would crave of thee the use of some palfrey whose pace may be softer than that of my destrier.” — Walter Scott, Ivanhoe
    • 1855, Dark and the Desert and Destriers me ken, And the Glaive and the Joust, and Paper and Pen. - Al-Mutanabbi tr. by Richard Burton

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

destrier m (plural destriers)

  1. destrier

External linksEdit