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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From charge +‎ -er.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

charger (plural chargers)

  1. a device that charges or recharges
    Put the batteries in the charger overnight so we can use them tomorrow.
  2. (historical) a large horse trained for battle and used by the cavalry (of a lighter build than a destrier)
    • 1938, George Orwell, Homage to Catalonia, Chapter 1, [1]
      My centuria slept in one of the stables, under the stone mangers where the names of the cavalry chargers were still inscribed.
    The knight rode a white charger.
  3. a large platter
  4. a large decorative plate, sometimes used under dinner plates or other savoury-dish vessels in a multi-course meal; also service plate or underplate
    The fancy restaurant used a white porcelain charger when serving.
  5. one who charges
  6. (firearms) a speedloader that holds several cartridges together in a single unit for easier loading of a firearm's magazine
  7. (prison) a rectal concealment container for prohibited material such as money, drugs and tools
    • 2004, Man on Fire, 01:44:10:
      "See this? This is a charger. It's used by convicts to hide money and drugs. They stick it in their body, they tuck it up their rectum."

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French chargier, from Late Latin carricāre, present active infinitive of carricō, from Latin carrus (four-wheeled baggage wagon). Compare Spanish cargar.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

charger

  1. to load (up) (vehicle, animal etc.)
  2. to load (firearm)
  3. to charge (battery)
  4. to put in charge; to charge (somebody with doing something)
  5. to charge (somebody of a crime)
  6. (military, sports) to charge
  7. (theater) to overact, ham it up
  8. (reflexive, se charger de) to take care of, see to

ConjugationEdit

This is a regular -er verb, but the stem is written charge- before endings that begin with -a- or -o- (to indicate that the -g- is a “soft” /ʒ/ and not a “hard” /ɡ/). This spelling-change occurs in all verbs in -ger, such as neiger and manger.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French chargier.

VerbEdit

charger

  1. to load (with goods, etc.)

ConjugationEdit

  • As parler except an extra e is inserted after the final g before a and o.
  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit