dudine

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

dude +‎ -ine.

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: dud‧ine

NounEdit

dudine ‎(plural dudines)

  1. (obsolete) A woman who is very concerned about her dress and appearance; a female dude.
    • 1883 March 7, “Animal Intelligence: Facts Tending to Throw Light on the Question: ‘Do Dudes Reason?’”, in Puck, volume XIII, number 313, New York, N.Y.: Keppler & Schwarzmann, OCLC 15863678, page 299:
      A very pretty little dudine of Fifth Avenue is much admired by the dudes in her neighborhood, and it has been observed on several occasions that she appeared to be able to discriminate between them, and not only shows a preference for one dude over another; but is able to recognize the dudes she likes after an interval of separation. It is said, also, that in accepting the attentions of her dude wooers, she shows a peculiar mimicry of the coquettish manners of human girls.
    • Sam Jones' Own Book: A Series of Sermons Collected and Edited Under the Author's Own Supervision, Page 251 by Sam Porter Jones, Publisher: Cranston and Stowe Pub:1887... in the universe is the natural product of fashionable society, the dude and the dudine; and you never catch a dude and a dudine marrying one another. ...
    • Stories of a Country Doctor - Page 324 by Willis Percival King - 1891 She was between sixty and seventy years of age at this time and was as pronounced a specimen of the type dudine as I ever saw.
    • Thomas Ruffin - Page 285 by Edward Winslow Gilliam - 1896 ... , one on each side, dudes and dudine—she sounding her vowels in the broad style heard in the drawing-room of the 400, and they looking sweet upon her ...
    • 2014, Jeremy Agnew, “The Image Persists”, in The Creation of the Cowboy Hero: Fiction, Film and Fact, Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Company, ISBN 978-0-7864-7839-2, page 212:
      "Dude" was originally a name for ranch vacationers with no disrespect attached, but it later became derisively associated with clueless easterners who knew nothing of Western ways, as portrayed by Bob Hope in Son of Paleface (1952). Junior's fiancé[sic, meaning fiancée] (Jane Russell) tells him to "go out West." When Junior (Bob Hope) wants to show that he has become a Westerner, he wears a tall outsized white hat like Tom Mix and white wooly chaps, the traditional movie outfit representing an eastern dude. A female dude was known as a "dudess" or "dudine."

AnagramsEdit