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EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English -ine, borrowed from Old French -ine, from Latin -īnus, from Ancient Greek -ινος (-inos). More at -en.

SuffixEdit

-ine

  1. (chiefly non-productive) Of or pertaining to.
    asinine, marine, bovine, cervine
  2. Used to form demonyms.
    Levantine, Byzantine, Argentine
  3. (chemistry) Used to form names of chemical substances, especially basic (alkaline) substances, alkaloidal substances, or halogen elements.
    amine, aniline, caffeine, iodine
  4. (non-productive) Used to form feminine nouns.
    hero + ‎-ine → ‎heroine
    speaker + ‎-ine → ‎speakerine
  5. (non-productive) Used to form female given names or names of titles.
    Clement + ‎-ine → ‎Clementine
    landgrave + ‎-ine → ‎landgravine
  6. Commercial materials
    glass + ‎-ine → ‎glassine
Derived termsEdit


Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Variant of -en.

SuffixEdit

-ine

  1. Can be used to denote the plural form of a small number of English words:
    cow + ‎-ine → ‎kine
    sow + ‎-ine → ‎swine

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

-in +‎ -e

SuffixEdit

-ine

  1. feminine singular of -in
  2. female equivalent of -in

IrishEdit

SuffixEdit

-ine f

  1. genitive of -in

ItalianEdit

SuffixEdit

-ine f pl

  1. plural of -ina

LatinEdit