See also: dudé and dudë

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • dood (nonstandard)
  • dewd (nonstandard)
  • d00d (Internet slang)

EtymologyEdit

Of unknown origin. First attested in 1883[1][2] as a New York City slang term of contempt for a "fastidious man, fop".[3] Possibly related to dawdle, to German Low German Dudeldop, Dudendop ‎(fool, dunce), from Middle Low German dudendop ‎(cuckold”, “simpleton), or to Saterland Frisian Duddigegen ‎(idiot). More likely derived from "Yankee Doodle",[4] or dudes (old rags, cf duds), and dudesman a scarecrow.[5]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

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Wikipedia

dude ‎(plural dudes)

  1. (colloquial) A man, generally a younger man.
    So we were at the mall and these two dudes just walk up to us and say "hi".
  2. (colloquial, used in the vocative) A more recent, slightly formal address for a young man or teenager, particularly when offering advice or cautioning.
    Dude, I'd be careful around the principal, he's having a bad day.
    Watch it, dude - you almost knocked me over.
  3. (originally) An inexperienced cowboy.
  4. (slang) A tourist.
  5. (archaic) A dandy, a man who is very concerned about his dress and appearance.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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Derived termsEdit

InterjectionEdit

dude

  1. (slang) A term conveying excitement.
    Dude, I’m glad you finally called.

VerbEdit

dude ‎(third-person singular simple present dudes, present participle duding, simple past and past participle duded)

  1. to address someone with the term of address dude

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ dude” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.
  2. ^ dude” in Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Online.
  3. ^ dude” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).
  4. ^ Popik and Cohen (2013), “Comments on Etymology”, in (Please provide the title of the work), issue October-November
  5. ^ Hill, Richard (1994), “You’ve Come a Long Way, Dude—A History”, in American Speech, issue 69, page 321–27 cited in Scott F. Kiesling (2004), “Dude”, in American Speech, issue 3

External linksEdit


AsturianEdit

Middle EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

dude

  1. did

SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dúde f pl ‎(genitive dúd, plurale tantum)

  1. bagpipes (musical instrument)

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dude

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of dudar.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of dudar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of dudar.
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