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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

en- +‎ cowl

VerbEdit

encowl (third-person singular simple present encowls, present participle encowling, simple past and past participle encowled)

  1. (transitive) To clothe (as) in a cowl; to make (someone) a monk.
    • 1622, Michael Drayton, The Second Part, or a Continuance of Poly-Olbion, London: John Marriott et al., Song 24, p. 96,[1]
      King Alfred that his Christ he might more surely hold,
      Left his Northumbrian Crowne, and soone became encould,
    • 1655, anonymous poem from the collection The Marrow of Compliments, in A. H. Bullen (ed.), Speculum Amantis, London, 1889, p. 98,[2]
      And is’t not brave when summer’s robes
      Have all the fields encowled
      To have a green gown on the grass
      And wear it uncontroul’d?

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