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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From en- +‎ gyve.

VerbEdit

engyve (third-person singular simple present engyves, present participle engyving, simple past and past participle engyved)

  1. (obsolete, rare) To put in gyves or shackles.
    • 1603, Michel de Montaigne, chapter 9, in John Florio, transl., The Essayes, [], book II, printed at London: By Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount [], OCLC 946730821:
      We have enough to doe, to endure the burthen of them, and are so engived and shackled in them, as if we were to fight but with the shocke or brunt of our armes: And as if we were as much bound to defend them, as they to shield us.
    • 1887, The Homiletic Review, vol.XIV:
      It is now, to the believer, not a tyrant to be dreaded, but a minister to perform a needed office; not a jailer to engyve us with the fetters of bondage, but a servant to assist us in unrobing for our entrance into the banqueting house [].