español

See also: Español

AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare Spanish español

AdjectiveEdit

español m sg (feminine singular española, neuter singular español, masculine plural españoles, feminine plural españoles)

  1. Spanish; pertaining to Spain, its people, culture,environment or language

InflectionEdit

gend/num singular plural
masculine español españoles
feminine española españoles
neuter español -

NounEdit

español m sg (feminine singular española, masculine plural españoles, feminine plural españoles)

  1. a Spaniard (man)

español m (uncountable)

  1. Spanish, Castilian (language)

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare Spanish español.

AdjectiveEdit

español m (feminine singular española, masculine plural españois, feminine plural españolas)

  1. Spanish; pertaining to Spain, its people, culture, or language

NounEdit

español m (plural españois, feminine española, feminine plural españolas)

  1. Spaniard (man)
  2. Spanish, Castilian (language)

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably a thirteenth-century borrowing from Old Occitan espaignol (compare modern Occitan espanhòl, Catalan espanyol, Portuguese espanhol, French espagnol), from Vulgar Latin *Hispaniolus (of Spain)[1], from Latin Hispānus, from Hispānia. According to phonetic rules, if inherited from Latin, the Castilian Spanish result would have been *españuelo (though some argue that this did not take root because the suffix -uelo would be perceived as diminutive; more likely, it was simply because there was no need at the time for a common secular name for all the inhabitants of Christian Iberia/Spain, and a common identity as a unified people or entity had not yet been formed. Until then, the people used cristiano (Christian) to refer to themselves). The word español was supposedly imported from Provence by a medieval chronicler (it was originally introduced by pilgrims in Santiago) because there was no existing translation of the earlier Roman word Hispani when writing a chronicle of Spanish history, but this was the word Provençal speakers used to refer to the Christian kingdoms of what would later become Spain[2]. In Old Spanish there was also a form españón which disappeared after the first half of the 14th century, possibly derived from a Vulgar Latin *Hispaniōnem[3]. Compare also espanesco, the word Mozarabic speakers used for themselves, presumably from a Vulgar Latin *Hispaniscus.[4]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /espaˈɲol/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

español (feminine singular española, masculine plural españoles, feminine plural españolas)

  1. Spanish (from or native to Spain)
  2. Spanish (pertaining to Spain or to the language)

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

español m (plural españoles, feminine española, feminine plural españolas)

  1. Spaniard (man)
  2. the Spanish language
    Synonym: castellano

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: Hispaniola (from the feminine española)
  • Hawaiian: Paniolo

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit