for good

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

Prepositional phraseEdit

for good

  1. (idiomatic) In a way that is conclusive and final.
    A bad haircut is no fun, but at least you're not stuck with it for good; only until it grows out.
    • 1748, Samuel Richardson, Clarissa, London, Volume 7, Letter 53, p. 200,[1]
      [] she was dozing in the elbow-chair, having refused to lie down, saying, She should soon, she hoped, lie down for good.
    • 1883, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island, London: Cassell, Chapter 26, p. 207,[2]
      [] do you take it as a dead man is dead for good, or do he come alive again?”
    • 1971, Leonard Cohen (lyrics and music), “Famous Blue Raincoat”:
      Yes, and thanks for the trouble you took from her eyes. I thought it was there for good so I never tried.
    • 2019, Maaza Mengiste, The Shadow King, New York: Norton, Book 3,
      He [] unbuttons the bottom of his jacket so the rumors can be dispelled for good: he no longer wears his double belts.

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