EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English for, from Old English for (for, on account of, for the sake of, through, because of, owing to, from, by reason of, as to, in order to), from Proto-Germanic *furi (for), from Proto-Indo-European *preh₂-.

Cognate with West Frisian foar (for), Dutch voor (for), German für (for), Danish for (for), Swedish för (for), Norwegian for (for), Icelandic fyrir (for), Latin per (by, through, for, by means of) and Romance language successors (e.g. Spanish para (for)), Ancient Greek περί (perí, for, about, toward), Lithuanian per (by, through, during), Sanskrit परि (pári, over, around).

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

for

  1. (literary) Because, as, since.
    I had to stay with my wicked stepmother, for I had nowhere else to go.
    • c. 1601, Shakespeare, William, Twelfth Night[1], act 3, scene 4:
      [] Dismount thy tuck, be yare in thy preparation, for thy assailant is quick, skillful and deadly.
    • 1885, Burton, Richard Francis, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night:
      [] nor is there found, in sea or on land, a sweeter or pleasanter of gifts than she; for she is prime in comeliness and seemlihead of face and symmetrical shape of perfect grace; her check is ruddy dight, her brow flower white, her teeth gem-bright, her eyes blackest black and whitest white, her hips of heavy weight, her waist slight and her favour exquisite.
    • 1900, Baum, L[yman] Frank, chapter 23, in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz:
      "By means of the Golden Cap I shall command the Winged Monkeys to carry you to the gates of the Emerald City," said Glinda, "for it would be a shame to deprive the people of so wonderful a ruler."

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

PrepositionEdit

for

  1. Towards; in the direction of.
    The astronauts headed for the moon.
    Run for the hills!
    He was headed for the door when he remembered.
  2. Directed at; intended to belong to.
    I have something for you.
  3. In order to help, benefit, gratify, honor etc. (someone or something).
    Everything I do, I do for you.
    We're having a birthday party for Janet.
    The mayor gave a speech for the charity gala.
  4. To be used or treated in a stated way, or with a stated purpose.
    This is a new bell for my bicycle.
    The cake is for Tom and Helen's anniversary.
    These apples here are for eating. The rest are for throwing away.
  5. Supporting, in favour of; (Should we delete(+) this sense?): wanting
    Antonym: against
    All those for the motion raise your hands.
    Who's for ice-cream?
    I'm for going by train
    Ten voted for, and three against. (with implied object)
  6. Because of.
    He wouldn't apologize; and just for that, she refused to help him.
    He looks better for having lost weight. (UK usage)
    She was the worse for drink.
    I like her for lots of reasons.
    • c. 1591–1592, William Shakespeare, “The Third Part of Henry the Sixt, []”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act II, scene v]:
      with fiery eyes sparkling for very wrath
    • 1867, Frederick Metcalfe, The Oxonian in Iceland, page 202:
      "A summerly day for you," said my host; "You ought to be here in winter. It is impossible then to get out of the doors for the snow and wind. Ugh! dreadful weather!"
    • 1864, George Etell Sargent, The Story of a City Arab (page 313)
      I could not see his hands, for the thick gloves he wore, and his face was partially concealed by a red woollen comforter; but his entire appearance and manners tallied with what I had seen of Yorkshire farmerhood.
  7. Intended to cure, remove or counteract; in order to cure, remove or counteract.
    This medicine is for your cough.
    I need to spray my house for termites.
  8. Over (a period of time).
    I've lived here for three years.
    They fought for days over a silly pencil.
    • 1717, Joseph Addison, Metamorphoses
      To guide the sun's bright chariot for a day.
  9. Throughout or across (a distance in space).
    I can see for miles.
  10. Used to introduce a subject within a to-infinitive clause.
    It is unreasonable for our boss to withhold our wages.
    All I want is for you to be happy.
  11. On behalf of.
    I will stand in for him.
    I speak for the Prime Minister.
  12. In the role or capacity of; instead of; in place of.
    I used a hay bale for a bed.
    He's got a turnip for a brain.
  13. In exchange for; in correspondence or equivalence with.
    I got five hundred pounds for that old car!
    He matched me blow for blow.
  14. In order to obtain or acquire.
    I am aiming for completion by the end of business Thursday.
    He's going for his doctorate.
    Do you want to go for coffee?
    People all over Greece looked to Delphi for answers.
    Can you go to the store for some eggs?
    I'm saving up for a car.
    Don't wait for an answer.
    What did he ask you for?
    • 1642, [John Denham], “The Prologue”, in The Sophy. [], 2nd edition, London: [] J[ohn] M[acock] for H[enry] Herringman, [], published 1667, OCLC 16384548:
      For we would have you know it, / The loſs will fall on us, not on the Poet: / For he writes not for money, nor for praiſe, / Nor to be call'd a Wit, nor to wear Bayes: []
  15. By the standards of, usually with the implication of those standards being lower than one might otherwise expect.
    Fair for its day.
    She's spry for an old lady.
  16. To be, or as being.
    Don't take me for a fool.
    • 17th century Abraham Cowley, Of Wit
      We take a falling meteor for a star.
    • a. 1705, John Locke, “Of the Conduct of the Understanding”, in Posthumous Works of Mr. John Locke: [], London: [] A[wnsham] and J[ohn] Churchill, [], published 1706, OCLC 6963663:
      if a man can be persuaded and fully assured of anything for a truth without having examined, what is there that he may not embrace for truth ?
    • c. 1690, John Dryden, Translations (Preface)
      Most of our ingenious young men take up some cry'd-up English poet for their model.
    • 1712, Ambrose Philips, The Distrest Mother
      But let her go for an ungrateful woman.
    • 1976, Louis L’Amour, The Rider of Lost Creek, Bantam Dell (→ISBN), Chapter 2:
      They knew him for a stranger.
  17. (usually in the phrase 'for all') Despite, in spite of.
    For all his expensive education, he didn't seem very bright.
    • 1898, H.G. Wells, The War of the Worlds, London: William Heinemann, page 113:
      "You must keep your head. There is still hope." "Hope!" "Yes; plentiful hope -- for all this destruction!"
    • 1892 August 6, "The Unbidden Guest", in Charles Dickens, Jr. (editor), All the Year Round,[2] page 133,
      Mr. Joseph Blenkinshaw was perhaps not worth quite so much as was reported; but for all that he was a very wealthy man []
    • 1968, J. J. Scarisbrick, Henry VIII, page 240:
      For all his faults, there had been something lofty and great about him - as a judge, as a patron of education, as a builder, as an international figure.
  18. Indicating something desired or anticipated.
    O for the wings of a dove.
    Ah! for wings to soar …
    And now for a slap-up meal!
    • 1623, William Shakespeare, The Life of Henry the Fift, Prologue:
      O For a Muſe of Fire, that would aſcend / The brighteſt Heauen of Inuention :
    • 1858 March 27, "The Lay of the Brief", in Punch, Or, The London Charivari, page 129:
      Oh! but to breathe the air / By their side under summer skies! To watch the blush on their cheeks, / The light in their liquid eyes. / Oh! but for one short hour, / To whisper a word of love; []
  19. (in expressions such as 'for a start') Introducing the first item(s) in a potential sequence.
    Go scuba diving? For one thing, I can't even swim.
  20. (with names, chiefly US) In honor of; after.
    He is named for his grandfather.
  21. Due or facing (a certain outcome or fate).
    He totally screwed up that project. Now he's surely for the sack.
  22. (chiefly US) Out of; used to indicate a fraction, a ratio
    In term of base hits, Jones was three for four on the day
  23. (cricket) Used as part of a score to indicate the number of wickets that have fallen.
    At close of play, England were 305 for 3.
  24. (obsolete) Indicating that in prevention of which, or through fear of which, anything is done.
  25. Used in various more-or-less idiomatic ways to construe individual verbs, indicating various semantic relationships such as target, purpose, result, etc.; see also the entries for individual phrasal verbs, e.g. ask for, look for, stand for, etc.
    to account for one's whereabouts    to care for a relative    to settle for second best    to allow for mistakes

Alternative formsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

ParticleEdit

for

  1. (nonstandard, in representations of dialectal speech, especially that of black speakers) To, the particle for marking the following verb as an infinitive.
    • 1896, McClure's magazine, page 270:
      “'Ugh—I'll not be able for get up. Send for M'sieu le Curé—I'll be goin' for die for sure.'
    • 1898 December 17, “Mr. Owens' Experience”, in Forest and Stream, volume 51, page 485:
      [It was a] firs rate place for shoot a woodcocks, I tell you. [...] I say [it] wass no use for spen money. [...] An I say in "So wass I. I see lot of sy-pokes fly up an twist off like screw-cork an spit whistle, but I wass'nt able for get aim on him."
    • 2007, H. Nigel Thomas, Return to Arcadia: A Novel (Tsar Publications):
      "She say that when nigger people step out o' they place and start for rub shoulders with Bacra, trouble just 'round the corner."

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Andrea Tyler and Vyvyan Evans, "Spatial particles of orientation", in The Semantics of English Prepositions: Spatial Scenes, Embodied Meaning and Cognition, Cambridge University Press, 2003, 0-521-81430 8
  • for at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • for in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

AnagramsEdit


AbinomnEdit

NounEdit

for

  1. a kind of fish

CatalanEdit

NounEdit

for m (plural fors)

  1. prize, worth
  2. forum

CornishEdit

NounEdit

for

  1. Mixed mutation of mor.

DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse fóðr, from Middle Low German vōder (linen, sheath), from Proto-Germanic *fōdrą (sheath).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

for n (singular definite foret, plural indefinite for)

  1. lining (covering for the inside of something)
  2. lining (material used for inside covering)
InflectionEdit

ReferencesEdit

for,1” in Den Danske Ordbog

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Danish for, from Proto-Germanic *furai (in Western Old Norse replaced by the variant Old Norse fyrr, from Proto-Germanic *furiz, *furi, = Danish before).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

for

  1. for
  2. of
  3. to
  4. on
  5. at
  6. before, in front of
  7. by

AdverbEdit

for

  1. too (more than enough; as too much)
  2. in front
  3. forward

ConjunctionEdit

for

  1. for, because

Etymology 3Edit

See fare (to rush, run).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈfoˀɐ̯], [ˈfoɐ̯ˀ]

VerbEdit

for, fór or farede

  1. past tense of fare.

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare Latin forās (outside).

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

for

  1. away, far, gone
    • 1998, Henrik Ibsen, trans. Odd Tangerud Puphejmo : Dramo en tri aktoj, [3]
      NORA (komencas elpreni el la skatolo, sed baldaŭ forĵetas ĉion). Ho, se mi kuraĝus eliri. Se nur neniu venus. Se nur ne dume okazus io hejme. Stulta babilaĵo; neniu venos. Nur ne pensi. Brosi la mufon. Delikataj gantoj, delikataj gantoj. For el la pensoj! For, for! Unu, du, tri, kvar, kvin, ses — (krias) Jen, tie ili venas —
      NORA (begins to unpack the box, but soon pushes it all away). Oh, if I dared go out. If only no one would come. If only I could be sure nothing would happen here in the meantime. Stupid nonsense; no one will come. Only I mustn't think about it. I will brush my muff. What lovely, lovely gloves. Out of my thoughts, Away, away! One, two, three, four, five, six— (Screams) There, someone's coming—

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin forum; doublet of fur and forum. Unrelated to French fort.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

for m (plural not attested)

  1. (obsolete) Only used in for intérieur

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Inflected form of ir (to go).

VerbEdit

for

  1. first/third-person singular future subjunctive of ir

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected form of ser (to be).

VerbEdit

for

  1. first/third-person singular future subjunctive of ser

IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

for f (genitive singular forar, nominative plural forir)

  1. mud
    Synonym: drulla
  2. bog

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from English far (from). Compare Esperanto for.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

for

  1. far from, away from

Derived termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *fāōr, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰéh₂ti (to speak). The verb's deponency's origin is unclear.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

for (present infinitive fārī or fārier, perfect active fātus sum); first conjugation, deponent, defective

  1. I speak, talk, say.

ConjugationEdit

Certain forms were not used in Classical Latin.

   Conjugation of for (first conjugation, deponent)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present for fāris, fāre fātur fāmur fāminī fantur
imperfect fābar fābāris, fābāre fābātur fābāmur fābāminī fābantur
future fābor fāberis, fābere fābitur fābimur fābiminī fābuntur
perfect fātus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect fātus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect fātus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present fer fēris, fēre fētur fēmur fēminī fentur
imperfect fārer fārēris, fārēre fārētur fārēmur fārēminī fārentur
perfect fātus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect fātus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present fāre fāminī
future fātor fātor fantor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives fārī, fārier1 fātum esse fātūrum esse
participles fāns fātus fātūrus fandus
verbal nouns gerund supine
genitive dative accusative ablative accusative ablative
fandī fandō fandum fandō fātum fātū

1The present passive infinitive in -ier is a rare poetic form which is attested for this verb.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • for in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • for in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • for in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • Karl Gottlob Zumpt, 1846, A school-grammar of the Latin language, p146

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English for, from Proto-Germanic *fura, *furi.

PrepositionEdit

for

  1. for

ConjunctionEdit

for

  1. for

DescendantsEdit

  • English: for
  • Scots: for
  • Yola: vor

ReferencesEdit


Middle IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish for, from Proto-Celtic *uɸor, from Proto-Indo-European *uper.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

for (with accusative or dative)

  1. on, over
    • c. 1000, The Tale of Mac Da Thó's Pig, section 1, published in Irische Teste, vol. 1 (1880), edited by Ernst Windisch:
      Boí rí amra for Laignib, .i. Mac Dathó a ainm.
      There was a wonderful king over the Leinstermen; Mac Dathó was his name.

Further readingEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

AdverbEdit

for

  1. too
    for ungtoo young
    for langttoo far
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

ConjunctionEdit

for

  1. for
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Norse fóðr

NounEdit

for n (definite singular foret, indefinite plural for, definite plural fora or forene)

  1. alternative form of fôr
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

PrepositionEdit

for

  1. for

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 5Edit

VerbEdit

for

  1. past tense of fare.

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

for

  1. for, because
    Eg joggar kvar dag, for eg vil ikkje bli feit.
    I jog every day, because I don't want to get fat.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse fǫr, from Proto-Germanic *farō. Related to fara.

PronunciationEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

for f (definite singular fora, indefinite plural forer, definite plural forene)

  1. travel
  2. footprints

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Norse for, probably derived from earlier Proto-Germanic *furhs.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

for f (definite singular fora, indefinite plural forer, definite plural forene)

  1. (agriculture) furrow
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit
  • får (Norwegian Bokmål)

Etymology 4Edit

PronunciationEdit

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

for (masculine and feminine for, neuter fort, definite singular and plural fore, comparative forare, indefinite superlative forast, definite superlative foraste)

  1. fast
    fórare!
    Go faster!

Etymology 5Edit

From Old Norse fóðr, from Proto-Germanic *fōdrą (fodder).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

for n (definite singular foret, indefinite plural for, definite plural fora)

  1. alternative form of fôr (fodder)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 6Edit

From Old Norse fóðr, borrowed from Middle Low German vōder (sheath, linen), from Proto-Germanic *fōdrą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

for n (definite singular foret, indefinite plural for, definite plural fora)

  1. alternative form of fôr (lining)

Etymology 7Edit

From Old Norse fyrir

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

for

  1. for
    Pass deg for snøskred!
    Look out for avalanches!
  2. of
    Eg bur sør for byen.
    I live south of the city.

AdverbEdit

for

  1. too
    Det er for langt å gå.
    It is too far to walk.
  2. in favour of
    Eg var for å bli med i FN.
    I was in favour of joining the UN.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 8Edit

VerbEdit

for

  1. misspelling of fór, present tense of fara and fare

for

  1. imperative of fòra and fòre
  2. imperative of fôra and fôre

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-West Germanic *furi

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

for

  1. for
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

see faran

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fōr

  1. first/third-person singular preterite of faran

Etymology 3Edit

From Proto-Germanic *fōrō (trip; wagon).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fōr f (nominative plural fōra)

  1. journey, going, course, expedition, approach; passage, lifestyle, way of life
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Variant of fearh. From Proto-West Germanic *farh (pig). Cognate with Middle Low German vōr (lean young pig).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fōr m

  1. hog, pig
DeclensionEdit
DescendantsEdit

Old IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Celtic *sweseros, from *swīs (you (pl.)); compare Latin vester.

Alternative formsEdit

DeterminerEdit

for (triggers eclipsis)

  1. your (plural)
  2. you (plural; as the object of a preposition that takes the genitive)

For quotations using this term, see Citations:for.

SynonymsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Irish: bhur
  • Scottish Gaelic: ur

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Celtic *uɸor, from Proto-Indo-European *upér.

Alternative formsEdit

PrepositionEdit

for (with accusative or dative)

  1. on, over

For quotations using this term, see Citations:for.

InflectionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Combinations with definite articles:

  • forsin(d) (masculine and feminine accusative singular, all genders dative singular)
  • forsa (neuter accusative singular)
  • for(s)na (accusative plural)
  • for(s)naib (dative plural)

Combinations with possessive determiners:

  • form (on my)
  • fort (on your sg)
  • fora (on his/her/its/their)

Combinations with relative pronouns:

  • for(s)a (on whom, on which)

Further readingEdit


Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably derived from Proto-Germanic *furhs.

NounEdit

for f

  1. furrow

DescendantsEdit

  • Norwegian Nynorsk: for
  • Norwegian Bokmål: får
  • Old Swedish: for

ReferencesEdit

  • for in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old SaxonEdit

NounEdit

for

  1. Alternative form of fora

PortugueseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

 
  • IPA(key): (Brazil) /ˈfoʁ/, [ˈfoh]
    • IPA(key): (São Paulo) /ˈfoɾ/, [ˈfoɾ]
    • IPA(key): (Rio) /ˈfoʁ/, [ˈfoχ]
  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /ˈfoɾ/, [ˈfoɾ]

  • Hyphenation: for
  • Rhymes: -oɾ

VerbEdit

for

  1. first-person singular (eu) future subjunctive of ir
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) future subjunctive of ir
    Quando for, avise-me.
    When she goes, let me know.
  3. first-person singular (eu) future subjunctive of ser
  4. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) future subjunctive of ser
    Enquanto ela for viva, merece todo o nosso respeito.
    As long as she is alive, she deserves all our respect.

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English for.

PronunciationEdit

 
  • IPA(key): (Brazil) /ˈfɔʁ/, [ˈfɔh]
    • IPA(key): (São Paulo) /ˈfɔɾ/, [ˈfɔɾ]
    • IPA(key): (Rio) /ˈfɔʁ/, [ˈfɔχ]
  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /ˈfɔɾ/, [ˈfɔɾ]

NounEdit

for m (plural fors)

  1. (programming) for loop (a loop that uses a counter)



RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin forum

NounEdit

for n (plural foruri)

  1. forum

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

VerbEdit

for

  1. past tense of fara.

WalloonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French forn, from Latin furnus.

NounEdit

for m (plural fors)

  1. oven