EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Originally the past participle of obsolete forcast (to cast away); also from Middle English forcasten, a variant of forcast (rejected, cast away), past participle of forcasten (to cast away, reject), of North Germanic origin, compare Danish forkaste (to reject), Swedish förkasta (to reject), equivalent to for- +‎ cast.

AdjectiveEdit

forcasten (comparative more forcasten, superlative most forcasten)

  1. (obsolete) Felled, fallen.
  2. (archaic, Britain dialectal) Cast away, rejected; neglected; not used, cast off.
    • 1891, Samuel Rutherford, Letters of Samuel Rutherford:
      I think Christ lieth like an old forcasten castle, forsaken of the inhabitants; all men run away now from Him.
  3. (dialectal, chiefly Scotland) Abandoned; forlorn.
    • 1976, David Craig, Scottish literature and the Scottish people:
      They dread full ill I was right poor, By my forcasten company.

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From for- +‎ casten (to throw, cast), of North Germanic origin, compare Danish forkaste (to reject), Swedish förkasta (to reject).

VerbEdit

forcasten

  1. to reject, cast away
  2. alternative past participle of forcasten

AdjectiveEdit

forcasten

  1. neglected