fruition

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfɹuː.ɪʃ.ən/
  • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /fɹu.ˈɪʃ.ən/
  • Hyphenation: fru‧ition
  • Rhymes: -ɪʃən

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin fruitiō (enjoyment).

NounEdit

fruition (countable and uncountable, plural fruitions)

  1. The fulfillment of something worked for.
    After six years of hard work, the engineers had brought the project to fruition.
    • 1914, John Jay Chapman, “The Wrath of Achilles. 1. The Embassy to Achilles.”, in Homeric Scenes: Hector’s Farewell and The Wrath of Achilles, New York, N.Y.: Laurence J. Gomme, OCLC 4703967, scene II, page 23:
      The myths possess us: through our agony / They work to new fruition.
  2. The enjoyment derived from a possession.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Erroneously from fruit (though now standard usage)

NounEdit

fruition (plural fruitions)

  1. The condition of bearing fruit.
TranslationsEdit