get some

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Reduced from get (some) action.

VerbEdit

get some (third-person singular simple present gets some, present participle getting some, simple past got some, past participle (UK) got some or (US) gotten some)

  1. (US, euphemistic, informal) To have sex.
    Synonyms: do it, get busy, get it on; see also Thesaurus:copulate
    So, did you get some with him?
    I'm going to that new club to get some tonight.
    • 1984, “The Bird”, in Ice Cream Castle, performed by ​The Time:
      White folks, you're much too tight / You gotta shake your head like the black folks / You might get some tonight, look out
    • 2003, Lane, J. B., “Manage Your Personal Space”, in Wine, Dine and 69 Ways to Get Some, Trafford Publishing, →ISBN:
      Proximity has a subtle, yet powerful effect on our social interactions. By definition, proximity refers to the degree of physical closeness or nearness in this case, with personal space. Logically, the closer you are, the closer you are to getting some.
  2. (dysphemistic, informal) To be involved in a fight or assault.
    Synonyms: do battle, get it on
    The young Marine was spoiling for a fight; he hoped to get some during his next tour of duty.
  3. Used other than figuratively or idiomatically: see get,‎ some.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit