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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French globule, from Latin globulus, from globus (globe).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

globule (plural globules)

  1. A small round particle of substance; a drop.
    • 1704, Sir Isaac Newton, Opticks, 3rd edition, London: W. and J. Innys, published 1721, page 289:
      Suppoſe now that in a fair Day the Sun ſhines through a thin Cloud of ſuch globules of Water or Hail, and that the globules are all of the ſame bigneſs []
    • 1991, Dean W. Ahrenholz, “Population Biology and Life History of the North American Menhadens, Brevoortia spp.”, in Marine Fisheries Review[1], page 9:
      They described the eggs as spherical in shape, highly transparent with a thin, horny egg membrane and a relatively wide perivitelline space. Each egg contained a single oil globule.
    • 2005 June 4, Janet Raloff, “Empty Nets: Fisheries may be crippling themselves by targeting the big ones”, in Science News[2]:
      Mature female black rockfish and newborn (inset), which sports an oil globule (arrow) - its prepacked lunch. Older moms give young a bigger starting meal, boosting the offsprings'[sic] growth and survival.

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin globulus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

globule m (plural globules)

  1. globule
  2. blood cell

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

globule

  1. vocative singular of globulus