See also: Drop and dråp

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

A drop of water (noun sense 1).
Eye drops (noun sense 1.2) being administered.
Drops (noun sense 3) of a chandelier.
Lemon drops (noun sense 3.1).
The drop (noun sense 4.1) of a keyhole.

Etymology 1Edit

From Late Middle English droppe, Middle English drope (small quantity of liquid; small or least amount of something; pendant jewel; dripping of a liquid; a shower; nasal flow, catarrh; speck, spot; blemish; disease causing spots on the skin) [and other forms],[1] from Old English dropa (a drop), from Proto-West Germanic *dropō (drop (of liquid)), from Proto-Germanic *drupô (drop (of liquid)),[2] from Proto-Indo-European *dʰrewb- (to crumble, grind).

NounEdit

drop (plural drops)

  1. (also figuratively) A small quantity of liquid, just large enough to hold its own round shape through surface tension, especially one that falls from a source of liquid.
    Put three drops of oil into the mixture.
    1. (pharmacology) A dose of liquid medicine in the form of a drop (sense 1).
      • 1986, Eugene Tinory, Journey from Ammeah: The Story of a Lebanese Immigrant, Brattleboro, Vt.: Amana Books, →ISBN, page 96:
        My first treatment consisted of one eye drop in each eye which was supposed to determine the condition of the eye and make it easier to examine them the next day.
      • 2009, Mark A[llan] Goldstein; Myrna Chandler Goldstein; Larry P. Credit, “Glaucoma [Tipes for Using Eye Drops]”, in Your Best Medicine: From Conventional and Complementary Medicine—Expert-endorsed Therapeutic Solutions to Relieve Symptoms and Speed Healing, New York, N.Y.: Rodale Books, →ISBN, part 2 (The Best Medicine for 81 Common Health Concerns), page 234, column 1:
        The eye is able to hold only about 20 percent of the amount of fluid in a standard eye drop. Therefore, put only one eye drop in your eye at a time. If you have been instructed to use more than one eye drop, wait about 5 minutes between the drops. This will allow more of the drops to be absorbed and will reduce waste.
    2. (pharmacology, chiefly in the plural) A liquid medicine that is intended to be administered in drops (sense 1).
      ear drops    eye drops
  2. (figuratively) A very small quantity of liquid, or (by extension) of anything.
    My aunt asked for just a drop more tea.
    He was thirsty but there wasn’t a drop of water to be found
    They didn’t show a drop of remorse
    • 1994, Yvonne Howell, “Introduction”, in Apocalyptic Realism: The Science Fiction of Arkady and Boris Strugatsky (Russian and East European Studies in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Culture; 1), New York, N.Y.: Peter Lang, →ISBN, ISSN 1065-9374, page 1:
      BAZARIN: Zoya Sergeevna, just a drop more tea, if you would. / ZOYA SERGEEVNA: (pouring tea) Do you want it strong?
    • 2008, Maureen Lipman, “Bar Mitzvah Joy”, in Past-It Notes, London: Aurum Press, published 2013, →ISBN:
      Finally she landed the role, and glory be to God, her best friend Melanie landed the role of Anne's best friend. Not one drop of help did she get from her showbiz parents, who were far too preoccupied with the shape of twenty-four table centre-pieces, []
    1. (chiefly Australia, Britain) A small amount of an alcoholic beverage.
      He usually enjoys a drop after dinner.    She won’t touch a drop while she’s on duty.
    2. (chiefly Britain) Usually preceded by the: alcoholic spirits in general.
      It doesn’t matter where you’re from, anyone who enjoys the drop is a friend of mine.
      • 1834, Peregrine Reedpen [pseudonym], “The Survey Continued. Odds and Ends.”, in Our Town; or, Rough Sketches of Character, Manners, &c. [], volume I, London: Richard Bentley, [], OCLC 230650092, page 61:
        She is rather fond of her drops, and is then particularly good-humoured; it is only when she is getting sober that she is querulous and nervous.
    3. (Ireland, informal) A single measure of whisky.
  3. That which hangs or resembles a liquid globule, such as a hanging diamond earring or ornament, a glass pendant on a chandelier, etc.
    1. Often preceded by a defining word: a small, round piece of hard candy, such as a lemon drop; a lozenge.
    2. (architecture) An ornament resembling a pendant; a gutta.
  4. A thing which drops or hangs down.
    1. The cover mounted on a swivel over a keyhole that rests over the keyhole when not in use to keep out debris, but is swiveled out of the way before inserting the key.
    2. (agriculture) A fruit which has fallen off a tree, etc., or has been knocked off accidentally, rather than picked.
      • 1986 June, “Information Obtained in the Investigation”, in Apple Juice: Report to the President on Investigation No. TA-201-59 under Section 201 of the Trade Act of 1974 (USITC Publication; 1861), Washington, D.C.: United States International Trade Commission, OCLC 14048250, page A-2:
        Drops are another source of juice apple supply. As the pickers pick apples in orchards oriented toward fresh-market or canning apples, apples fall or are accidentally knocked to the ground; these are drops. The only use for drops is juice production.
      • 1993, United States Commission on Agricultural Workers, “The Apple Industry in New York and Pennsylvania”, in Case Studies and Research Reports Prepared for the Commission on Agricultural Workers 1989–1993 to Accompany the Report of the Commission: Appendix I, Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, OCLC 760666946, page 387, column 1:
        Drops are fruit that has fallen to the ground naturally or that is dropped or knocked off during harvest. Drops have no value except for pressing for juice. While the value of drops is usually minimal, they must be removed from the orchards; otherwise, they attract mice which later in the season, once the apples are gone, gnaw on the roots of apple trees.
      • 2002, Ken Haedrich, “Very Apple Apple Pies”, in Apple Pie: 100 Delicious and Decidedly Different Recipes for America’s Favorite Pie, Boston, Mass.: The Harvard Common Press, →ISBN, page 97, column 1:
        But in the fall, when apples are abundant and cheap, I like to make my own [applesauce]. I'll often buy a few bags of "drops" just for this purpose. Drops are apples that have fallen from the trees instead of being picked. They're less expensive since they might have a bruise or two, but otherwise they're fresh nd juicy.
      • 2005 October, Michael Phillips, “Growing Apples Locally”, in The Apple Grower: A Guide for the Organic Orchardist, revised edition, White River Junction, Vt.: Chelsea Green Publishing Company, →ISBN, page 3:
        Biologically based IPM goes further by integrating orchard practices for common gain. Thus, in a second-level IPM orchard, sprays are withheld after June to allow beneficial insect populations to rebuild; summer maggot fly incursions are trapped at the border; drops are removed to limit in-orchard pest pupation; and fall sanitation is used to reduce disease inoculum the following spring.
      • 2009, Ben Watson, Cider, Hard and Sweet: History, Traditions, and Making Your Own, 2nd edition, Woodstock, Vt.: The Countryman Press, →ISBN, page 54, column 1:
        Drops are often considered the same as windfalls, and some people insist that any fruit that has fallen to the the ground—no matter for how short a time—should not be used for making cider. [] Drops, on the other hand [unlike windfalls], are fruits that have sat around on the ground for a longer period of time—typically a day or more.
    3. (American football) A dropped pass.
      Yet another drop for the Tiger tight end.
    4. (law enforcement) A trapdoor (hinged platform) on a gallows; a gallows itself.
      • 2003, Ian Jones, Ned Kelly: A Short Life[1], revised edition, Sydney, N.S.W.: Hachette Australia, published 2010, →ISBN:
        As the prisoners prepared to leave, they had seen Dan and Steve standing together in the breezeway, ‘for all the world like two condemned prisoners on the drop’.
      • 2015 November 25, Benjamin Ross; Barry Langford, “All the Lost Children”, in The Frankenstein Chronicles, season 1, episode 3, 26:40 from the start:
        Crook: "I'll find the killers for you, I swear." / Cop: "So why didn't you?" / Crook: "I'm scared of 'em." / Cop: "More than the drop?" / Crook: "Aye. Maybe."
    5. (online gaming, video games) An item made available for the player to pick up from the remains of a defeated enemy.
    6. (technology)
      1. A mechanism for lowering something, such as a machine for lowering heavy weights on to a ship's deck, or a device for temporarily lowering a gas jet, etc.
      2. Short for drop hammer and drop press.
    7. (theater) A curtain which falls in front of a theatrical stage; also, a section of (cloth) scenery lowered on to the stage like a curtain.
      • 1983, Theatre Crafts, New York, N.Y.: Theatre Crafts Associates, ISSN 0040-5469, OCLC 473518208, page 61, column 1:
        La Cage's upstage drops include two of the St. Tropez harbor (one for the day and another for the night), [... an] ocean drop (used in an Act I dream sequence), and an abstract chandelier drop (used in the second act []).
      • 2007, Michele Fields, Designing The Rover (unpublished M.F.A. dissertation), Madison, Wis.: University of Wisconsin–Madison, OCLC 154320862:
        In The Rover, one of these esthetically important elements was the arrangement of the upstage drops. Originally the drop was split into three sections, with obvious and blatant seams between them.
  5. An act or instance of dropping (in all senses).
    1. An act of moving downwards under the force of gravity; a descent, a fall.
      That was a long drop, but fortunately I didn’t break any bones.
    2. An instance of making a delivery of people, supplies, or things, especially by parachute out of an aircraft (an airdrop), but also by truck, etc.
      The delivery driver has to make three more drops before lunch.
      The spy made the drop, leaving the plans under the tree as arranged.
    3. A release (of music, a video game, etc).
    4. (gambling) The amount of money that a gambler exchanges for chips in a casino.
      • 1996, Steve Bourie; Anthony Curtis [et al.], American Casino Guide, 1997 edition, Dania, Fla.: Casino Vacations, →ISBN, page 12:
        What the first column in the table shows you is how much the casinos won as a percentage of the drop. For example, on the roulette table for every $100 that went into the drop box the casino wonj $22.70 or 22.70%. [] In other words, the drop tells you how many chips were bought at that table, but it doesn't tell you how many bets were made with those chips.
    5. (law enforcement, informal) Preceded by the: execution by hanging.
      • 2011, Elizabeth Dale, “Justice is Served”, in The Chicago Trunk Murder: Law and Justice at the Turn of the Century, DeKalb, Ill.: Northern Illinois University Press, →ISBN, page 74:
        [A]ll those present shared the all-important political connections required to get a ticket to the execution. News reporters, doctors, and members of the juries had prime spots right by the platform, so that they could see the drop and record the time of death.
    6. (sports)
      1. Usually preceded by the: relegation from one division to a lower one.
      2. (American football) Short for drop-back.
        The Tiger quarterback took a one-step drop, expecting his tight end to be open.
      3. (pinball) Short for drop target.
      4. (rugby) Short for drop kick.
    7. (US, banking, dated) An unsolicited credit card issue.
  6. A decline in degree, quality, quantity, or rate.
    The drop in demand for oil resulted in a drop in prices.
    • 1935 January 17, Gardiner C[olt] Means, “Appendix L. The Necessity for Supplying the Right Amount of Monetary Medium.”, in Industrial Prices and Their Relative Inflexibility [] (74th Congress, 1st Session; document no. 13), Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, OCLC 5138417, paragraphs 5–6, page 37:
      [T]he volume of money was expected to fluctuate with the volume of business activity so that a drop in business activity would bring a drop in the volume of money outstanding. [] If the volume of money is reduced, it tends to produce a slight drop in demand for all sorts of commodities.
    1. (sewing)
      1. Of men's clothes: the difference between the chest circumference and waist circumference.
      2. Of women's clothes: the difference between the bust circumference and hip circumference.
  7. The distance through which something drops, or falls below a certain level.
    1. The distance below a cliff or other high position through which someone or something could fall; hence, a steep slope.
      On one side of the road was a 50-foot drop.
      • 1982, John Ball, “Preface”, in Ananda: Where Yoga Lives, Bowling Green, Oh.: Bowling Green University Popular Press, →ISBN, page 6:
        An Ananda truck coming down a steep, winding mountain road completely lost its brakes and crashed through a thin guard rail over an almost sheer 1000 foot drop. It was caught and held by a solitary tree that was growing in the one and only spot where it could prevent a certain fatal plunge. No one was even slightly injured.
    2. The vertical length of a hanging curtain.
    3. (engineering) The distance of the axis of a shaft below the base of a hanger.
    4. (law enforcement) The distance that a person drops when being executed by hanging.
    5. (nautical) The depth of a (square) sail (generally applied to the courses only); the vertical dimension of a sail.
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Ham. Nav. Encyc to this entry?)
  8. A place where items or supplies may be left for others to collect, whether openly (as with a mail drop), or secretly or illegally (as in crime or espionage); a drop-off point.
    I left the plans at the drop, like you asked.
  9. Only used in get the drop on and have the drop on: an advantage.
  10. (music) A point in a song, usually electronic music such as dubstep, house, trace, or trap, where there is a very noticeable and pleasing change in bass, tempo, and/or overall tone; a climax, a highlight.
    • 2012 June 26, Genevieve Koski, “Music: Reviews: Justin Bieber: Believe”, in The A.V. Club[4], archived from the original on 6 August 2020:
      But musical ancestry aside, the influence to which [Justin] Bieber is most beholden is the current trends in pop music, which means Believe is loaded up with EDM [electronic dance music] accouterments, seeking a comfortable middle ground where Bieber’s impressively refined pop-R&B croon can rub up on techno blasts and garish dubstep drops (and occasionally grind on some AutoTune, not necessarily because it needs it, but because a certain amount of robo-voice is expected these days).
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

French fries being dropped (verb sense 16.2) or deep-fried on board the USS Monterey (CG-61).
An ewe dropping a lamb (verb sense 17).

From Middle English droppen, dropen (to fall in drops, drip or trickle down; to scatter, sprinkle; to be covered with a liquid; to give off moisture; of an object: to drop, fall; of a living being: to fall to the ground) [and other forms],[3] from Old English dropian, droppian (to drop),[4] from dropa (a drop) (see further at etymology 1) + -ian (suffix forming verbs from adjectives and nouns).

VerbEdit

drop (third-person singular simple present drops, present participle dropping, simple past and past participle dropped or (archaic) dropt)

  1. (intransitive) Of a liquid: to fall in drops or droplets. [from 11th c.]
  2. (intransitive, also figuratively) To fall (straight down) under the influence of gravity, like a drop of liquid. [from 14th c.]
    A single shot was fired and the bird dropped from the sky.
  3. (intransitive) To fall or sink quickly or suddenly to the ground. [from 15th c.]
    Drop and give me thirty push-ups, private!
    If your clothes are on fire, stop, drop and roll.
  4. (intransitive) To collapse in exhaustion or injury; also, to fall dead, or to fall in death.
    • 1722 September 12, Robert Digby, “[Letters to and from the Hon. Robert Digby. From 1717 to 1724.] Letter X [to Alexander Pope].”, in The Works of Alexander Pope Esq., volume VIII (Being the Second of His Letters), London: [] J. and P. Knapton [], published 1751, OCLC 1050460063, page 43:
      Nothing, ſays Seneca, is ſo melancholy a circumſtance in human life, or ſo ſoon reconciles us to the thought of our own death, as the reflection and prospect of one friend after another dropping round us!
  5. (intransitive) To fall into a particular condition or state.
  6. (intransitive) To come to an end (by not being kept up); to lapse, to stop. [from 17th c.]
    • 1897 October 16, Henry James, chapter X, in What Maisie Knew, Chicago, Ill.; New York, N.Y.: Herbert S. Stone & Co., OCLC 318438930, page 108:
      When he again found privacy consistent, however—and it happened to be long in coming—he took up their conversation very much where it had dropped.
  7. (intransitive) To decrease, diminish, or lessen in condition, degree, value, etc. [from 18th c.]
    • The equipment shows how much the glacier has moved and the amount it dropped in height over the summer.
    The stock dropped 1.5% yesterday.
    We can take our vacation when the price of fuel drops.
    Watch for the temperature to drop sharply, then you’ll know the reaction is complete.
    • 1918, W[illiam] B[abington] Maxwell, chapter XXXVII, in The Mirror and the Lamp, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 4293071, page 296:
      This time was most dreadful for Lilian. Thrown on her own resources and almost penniless, she maintained herself and paid the rent of a wretched room near the hospital by working as a charwoman, sempstress, anything. In a moment she had dropped to the level of a casual labourer.
    1. (intransitive) Of a song or sound: to lower in key, pitch, tempo, or other quality.
      My synthesizer makes the notes sound funny when they drop below C2.
      The song, 180 beats per minute, drops to 150 BPM near the end.
    2. (intransitive) Of a voice: to lower in timbre, often due to puberty.
      Billy’s voice dropped suddenly when he turned 12.
      • 2012 June 26, Genevieve Koski, “Music: Reviews: Justin Bieber: Believe”, in The A.V. Club[5], archived from the original on 6 August 2020:
        The 18-year-old [Justin] Bieber can’t quite pull off the “adult” thing just yet: His voice may have dropped a bit since the days of “Baby,” but it still mostly registers as “angelic,” and veers toward a pubescent whine at times.
  8. (intransitive) To fall behind or to the rear of a group of people, etc., as a result of not keeping up with those at the front.
  9. (intransitive) Usually followed by by, in, or into: of a person: to visit someone or somewhere informally or without a prior appointment.
    Do drop by soon and I’ll lend you that book.
    We’ll drop in on her tomorrow.
    • 1897 December (indicated as 1898), Winston Churchill, chapter I, in The Celebrity: An Episode, New York, N.Y.: The Macmillan Company; London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd., OCLC 222716698, page 2:
      He used to drop into my chambers once in a while to smoke, and was first-rate company. When I gave a dinner there was generally a cover laid for him. I liked the man for his own sake, and even had he promised to turn out a celebrity it would have had no weight with me. I look upon notoriety with the same indifference as on the buttons on a man's shirt-front, or the crest on his note-paper.
  10. (intransitive, computing, music, television, colloquial) Of a programme, software, a music album or song, etc.: to enter public distribution.
    The album Hip-Hop Xmas dropped in time for the holidays.
  11. (intransitive, gambling) To drop out of the betting.
    • 1990, Stewart Wolpin, The Rules of Neighborhood Poker According to Hoyle (page 219)
      But more important, if I dropped, Marty would have won the hand automatically.
  12. (intransitive, physiology, informal) Of the testicles: to hang further away from the body and begin producing sperm due to puberty.
  13. (intransitive, obsolete) To let drops fall; to discharge itself in drops.
    • 1611 King James Bible, Psalms 68:8
      The heavens [] dropped at the presence of God.
  14. (transitive) To drip (a liquid) in drops or small amounts. [from 14th c.]
  15. (transitive, ergative, also figuratively) To let (something) fall; to allow (something) to fall (either by releasing hold of, or losing one's grip on). [from 14th c.]
    Don’t drop that plate!    The police ordered the men to drop their weapons.
  16. (transitive) To move to a lower position; to allow to hang downwards; to lower.
    • 1934, Agatha Christie, chapter 8, in Murder on the Orient Express, London: HarperCollins, published 2017, page 129:
      The stare seemed to abash Poirot. He dropped his eyes and began fiddling with the papers in front of him.
    1. To quickly lower or take down (one's trousers), especially in public.
    2. (cooking) To cook (food, especially fast food), particularly by lowering into hot oil to deep-fry, or by grilling.
      Drop a basket of fries.
  17. (transitive) Of an animal (usually a sheep): to give birth to (young); of a bird: to lay (an egg).
    to drop a lamb
  18. (transitive) To mention (something) casually or incidentally, usually in conversation. [from 17th c.]
    The lecturer would drop hints whenever the students struggled.
  19. (transitive) To let (a letter, etc.) fall into a postbox; hence, to send (a letter, email, or other message) in an offhand manner. [from 18th c.]
    As she had a free moment, she dropped her a text.
    Drop me a note when you get to the city.
  20. (transitive) To make (someone or something) fall to the ground from a blow, gunshot, etc.; to bring down, to shoot down. [from 18th c.]
    Make any sudden movements and I will drop you!
    • 1846, ed. by G. W. Nickisson, “Elephant-Shooting in Ceylon”, in Fraser's Magazine, vol. XXXIII, no. CXCVII
      page 562: ...if the first shot does not drop him, and he rushes on, the second will be a very hurried and most likely ineffectual one...
      page 568 ...with a single shot he dropped him like a master of the art.
    • 1892, Alexander A. A. Kinloch, Large Game Shooting in Thibet, the Himalayas, Northern and Central India, page 126
      As with all other animals, a shot behind the shoulder is the most likely to drop the beast on the spot []
    • 1921, Daniel Henderson, Boone of the Wilderness, page 54
      He dropped the beast with a bullet in its heart.
    • 1985, Beastie Boys, Paul Revere:
      The piano player's out, the music stopped / His boy had beef, and he got dropped...
    • 1992, Dan Parkinson, Dust on the Wind, page 164
      With a quick clench of the fist on Joey's throat, Bodie dropped him. The man crumpled to the ground []
  21. (transitive) To set down (someone or something) from a vehicle; to stop and deliver or deposit (someone or something); to drop off.
    Could you drop me at the airport on your way to work tomorrow?
    I’ll be dropping the parcel at your place later.
  22. (transitive) To lower (a sound, a voice, etc.) in pitch or volume.
    1. (transitive, music) To tune (a guitar string, etc.) to a lower note.
  23. (transitive) To cease concerning oneself over (someone or something); to have nothing more to do with (a discussion, subject, etc.). [from 17th c.]
    I’m tired of this subject. Will you just drop it?
    • 1739, Samuel Sharp, A Treatise on the Operations of Surgery:
      They suddenly dropt the pursuit.
    • 1815, Sir Walter Scott, Guy Mannering; Or, The Astrologer
      The connection had been dropped many years.
    • 1859, William Makepeace Thackeray, The Virginians: A Tale of the Last Century
      that astonishing ease with which fine ladies drop you and pick you up again
  24. (transitive) To dispose or get rid of (something); to lose, to remove.
    I dropped ten pounds and an obnoxious fiancée.
  25. (transitive) To cease to include (something), as if on a list; to dismiss, to eject, to expel.
    I’ve been dropped from the football team.
    • 2019, Louise Taylor, Alex Morgan heads USA past England into Women’s World Cup final (in The Guardian, 2 July 2019)[6]
      If Carly Telford’s replacement of Karen Bardsley, because of a hamstring injury, was enforced, the switch to 4-4-1-1 was not. This new-look configuration saw Rachel Daly deployed in front of Lucy Bronze down the right, Toni Duggan and Fran Kirby dropped, Beth Mead introduced on the left and Nikita Parris moved up front.
  26. (transitive) To cancel or cease to participate in (a scheduled course, event, or project).
    I had to drop calculus because it was taking up too much of my time.
  27. (transitive, slang)
    1. To lose, spend, or otherwise part with (money). [from 17th c.]
      • 1949, The Atlantian, v 8, Atlanta: United States Penitentiary, p 41:
        The question was: Who put the most in the collection box? The wealthy guy, who dropped a “C” note, or the tattered old dame who parted with her last tarnished penny.
      • 2000, Lisa Reardon, Blameless: A Novel, Random House, p 221:
        I forked over the $19.25. I was in no position to be dropping twenties like gumdrops but I deserved something good from this crappy morning.
    2. To pass or use (counterfeit cheques, money, etc.).
    3. To impart (something).
      I drop knowledge wherever I go.
    4. Especially in drop acid: to swallow (a drug, particularly LSD). [from 20th c.]
  28. (transitive, computing, music, television, colloquial) To release (a programme, software, a music album or song, etc.) to the public.
    They dropped the album Hip-Hop Xmas in time for the holidays.
    That hacker has been threatening to drop my docs [i.e. publish my personal information].
  29. (transitive, linguistics) To fail to write, or (especially) to pronounce (a syllable, letter, etc.). [from 19th c.]
    Cockneys drop their aitches.
  30. (transitive, music)
    1. To play (a portion of music) in the manner of a disc jockey.
      I love it when he drops his funky beats.
      That guy can drop the bass like a monster.
    2. To perform (rap music).
      Yo, I drop rhymes like nobody’s business.
  31. (transitive, sports)
    1. (originally US) To (unexpectedly) lose (a competition, game, etc.).
    2. (cricket) Of a fielder: to fail to dismiss (a batsman) by accidentally dropping a batted ball that had initially been caught.
      Warne dropped Tendulkar on 99. Tendulkar went on to get a century next ball.
    3. (rugby) To score (a goal) by means of a drop kick.
  32. (transitive, archaic) To cover (something) with or as if with drops, especially of a different colour; to bedrop, to variegate.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost
      their waved coats dropped with gold
ConjugationEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ drōpe, n.(1)”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  2. ^ Compare “drop, n.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 1897; “drop, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  3. ^ droppen, v.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  4. ^ drop, v.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 1897; “drop, v.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Slavic *dropъty, which is a compound, whose first part is probably from Proto-Indo-European *dreh₂- (run) and the other from Proto-Slavic *pъta (bird), which is probably based on Proto-Indo-European *put- (a young, a child, a little animal).[1][2]

NounEdit

drop m

  1. bustard
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English drop (act of dropping).

NounEdit

drop m

  1. (golf) dropping a new ball from hand from shoulder height and arm's length, if the original ball was lost.
DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "drop" in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, Leda, 2015, →ISBN, page 157–158.
  2. ^ "pták" in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, Leda, 2015, →ISBN, page 569.

Further readingEdit

  • drop in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • drop in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch drope (drop), from Old Dutch dropo, from Proto-Germanic *drupô. The sense “licorice” developed from the sense “drop of licorice extract”; compare also English lemon drop.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

drop f (plural droppen, diminutive dropje n)

  1. droplet

SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

drop f or n (uncountable, diminutive dropje n)

  1. licorice, especially a variety sold as small sweets/candies.

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English drop.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

drop m (plural drops)

  1. (rugby) drop goal

Further readingEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *dropъty, whose first part is probably from Proto-Indo-European *dreh₂- (run) and the other from Proto-Slavic *pъta (bird), which is probably based on Proto-Indo-European *put- (a young, a child, a little animal).[1][2]

Compare Czech drop and Russian дрофа (drofa). Cognate with German Trappe.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

drop m anim

  1. bustard; a bird belonging to the family Otididae, especially the great bustard (Otis tarda) or any member of the genus Ardeotis

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • drop in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • drop in Polish dictionaries at PWN

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "drop" in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, Leda, 2015, →ISBN, page 157–158.
  2. ^ "pták" in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, Leda, 2015, →ISBN, page 569.