goatish

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

goat +‎ -ish

AdjectiveEdit

goatish ‎(comparative more goatish, superlative most goatish)

  1. Goaty, goatlike.
    • c. 1605, William Shakespeare, King Lear, Act I, Scene 2, [1]
      An admirable evasion of whore-master man, to lay his goatish disposition to the charge of a star!
    • 1774, Edward Long, The History of Jamaica, London: Lowndes, Volume II, Chapter XIII, p. 328, [2]
      Many are the men, of every rank, quality, and degree here, who would much rather riot in these goatish embraces, than share the pure and lawful bliss derived from matrimonial, mutual love.
    • 1887, Benvenuto Cellini, Autobiography, translated by John Addington Symonds, New York: P.F. Collier & Son, 1910, Book 2, Chapter XXI, p. 294, [3]
      Though I call them satyrs, they showed nothing of the satyr except little horns and a goatish head; all the rest of their form was human.
    • 1934, George Orwell, Burmese Days, Chapter 7, [4]
      He went through a pantomime of examining a joint of meat, with goatish sniffs.
    • 1985, Primo Levi, If Not Now, When?, translated by William Weaver, New York: Summit, Chapter 12, p. 330,
      She was perfumed, and beside the wave of her perfume, Mendel perceived uneasily the heavy, goatish odor of Pavel's sweating body.

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