guillemet

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French guillemet, diminutive form of the name Guillaume (William), named after French typecutter Guillaume Le Bé (1525–1598) who supposedly invented the marks.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌɡi.(j)əˈme(ɪ)/, /ˈɡɪl.əˌmɛt/[2][3]
    • (file)

NounEdit

guillemet (plural guillemets)

  1. Either of the punctuation marks « or », used in several languages to indicate passages of speech. Similar to typical quotation marks used in the English language, such as " (and formerly also and ).
    • 2021, Claire Cock-Starkey, Hyphens & Hashtags, Bodleian Library, page 49:
      Guillemets, however, proved popular and remain the key method of indicating quotations in French, Arabic, Italian, Greek and many other languages.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Microsoft Character design standards, Latin 1: Punctuation Design Standards (§ Pointing quotation marks – Guillemets)
  2. ^ guillemet”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.
  3. ^ guillemet” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Diminutive form of the name Guillaume (William), named after French typecutter Guillaume Le Bé (1525–1598), 1677.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

guillemet m (plural guillemets)

  1. quotation mark
  2. guillemet

Usage notesEdit

In French typography, a space is put after the opening guillemet and before the closing one. This rule is followed in France and most of the time in Canadian usage but not necessary elsewhere and not necessary on the internet, even on French websites; in Switzerland, no space is required in punctuation.

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit