improviso

See also: improvisó

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin improvisus (unforeseen); compare Italian improvviso.

AdjectiveEdit

improviso (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Not prepared beforehand; unpremeditated; extemporaneous.
    • a. 1784, Samuel Johnson, "Improviso Translation of the following lines of M. Benserade A Son Lit"

ReferencesEdit


CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

improviso

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of improvisar

GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

improviso

  1. first-person singular present indicative of improvisar

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

imprōvīsō

  1. dative/ablative masculine/neuter singular of imprōvīsus

ReferencesEdit

  • improviso”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

PortugueseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin imprōvīsus (unforeseen).

NounEdit

improviso m (plural improvisos)

  1. improvisation (act or art of composing and rendering music, poetry, and the like, without prior preparation)
  2. makeshift (a temporary, usually insubstantial, substitution for something else)

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

improviso

  1. first-person singular present indicative of improvisar

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /impɾoˈbiso/ [ĩm.pɾoˈβ̞i.so]
  • Rhymes: -iso
  • Hyphenation: im‧pro‧vi‧so

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin imprōvīsus.

AdjectiveEdit

improviso (feminine improvisa, masculine plural improvisos, feminine plural improvisas)

  1. unannounced; out of the blue

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

improviso

  1. first-person singular present indicative of improvisar

Further readingEdit