in fine

See also: infine

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin in fine.

AdverbEdit

in fine

  1. (archaic) Ultimately, in the end; in conclusion.
    • 1749, Cleland, John, Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure, Penguin, published 1985, page 66:
      Presently, when they had exchanged a few kisses, and questions in broken English on one side, he began to unbutton, and, in fine, stripped into his shirt.
    • 1780, Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Article I:
      All men are born free and equal, and have certain natural, essential, and unalienable rights; among which may be reckoned the right of enjoying and defending their lives and liberties; that of acquiring, possessing, and protecting property; in fine, that of seeking and obtaining their safety and happiness.
    • 1843, Carlyle, Thomas, “III, The One Institution”, in Past and Present, book 4:
      Then again, why should there not be an ‘Emigration Service,’ and Secretary, with adjuncts, with funds, forces, idle Navy-ships, and ever-increasing apparatus; in fine an effective system of Emigration; []
    • 1897, Robinson, Edwin Arlington, Richard Cory:
      In fine, we thought that he was everything / To make us wish that we were in his place.”
    • 1911, Beerbohm, Max, Zuleika Dobson:
      “My temper is sweet, and my character without blemish. In fine, Miss Dobson, I am a most desirable parti.”
    • 1961, “Trouble In The Amen Corner”, performed by Jim Reeves:
      [] the church was told in fine that Brother Ayer must stop his singing []

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

in fine

  1. (formal, finance) ultimately, in the end