See also: financé

English

edit

Etymology

edit

From Middle English finaunce, from Anglo-Norman, Middle French finance, from finer (to pay ransom) (whence also English fine (to pay a penalty)), from fin (end), from Latin fīnis.[1][2]

Original English sense c. 1400 was “ending”. Sense of “ending/satisfying a debt” came from French influence: in sense of “ransom” mid 15th century, in sense of “taxation” late 15th century. In sense of “manage money” first recorded 1770.[1]

Pronunciation

edit
  • IPA(key): /ˈfaɪnæns/, /faɪˈnæns/, /fɪˈnæns/
  • Audio (Southern England):(file)
  • Hyphenation: fi‧nance
  • Rhymes: -æns

Noun

edit

finance (countable and uncountable, plural finances)

  1. The management of money and other assets.
    • 4th century BCE, Aristotle, Politics, volume book I, part XI; republished as John Alexander Smith, William David Ross, transl., The works of Aristotle translated into English, volume 10, 1908:
      And statesmen as well ought to know these things; for a state is often as much in want of money and of such devices for obtaining it as a household, or even more so; hence some public men devote themselves entirely to finance.
    • 2013 June 1, “End of the peer show”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8838, page 71:
      Finance is seldom romantic. But the idea of peer-to-peer lending comes close. This is an industry that brings together individual savers and lenders on online platforms. Those that want to borrow are matched with those that want to lend.
  2. The science of management of money and other assets.
  3. (usually in the plural) Monetary resources, especially those of a public entity or a company.
    Who's really in charge of a democracy's finances?
  4. The provision of a loan, payment instalment terms, or similar arrangement, to enable a customer to purchase an item without paying the full amount straight away.
    Finance on all our new cars is provided by ABC Loans Ltd.

Hyponyms

edit

Derived terms

edit
edit

Translations

edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb

edit

finance (third-person singular simple present finances, present participle financing, simple past and past participle financed)

  1. (intransitive) To conduct, or procure money for, financial operations; manage finances.
  2. (intransitive, obsolete) To pay ransom.
  3. (transitive) To manage financially; be financier for; provide or obtain funding for a transaction or undertaking.
    Synonym: fund
    His parents financed his college education.
    He financed his home purchase through a local credit union.
    • 1995, A. D. F. Price, Financing International Projects[1], page 3:
      Therefore, when assets are examined together with other problems, such as one-sided contracts or delays in payment, the argument for financing construction projects is substantially weakened.
    • 2000, G. Colombo, Sanctions and remedies in cases of illegal financing of political parties, Trading in Influence and the Illegal Financing of Political Parties, Third European Conference of Specialised Services in the Fight against Corruption, page 64,
      Indeed, it is a crime to finance or make contributions in any form to political parties, their factions, parliamentary groups, i.e. members of the Italian parliament (if they are Italian) and the European parliament, regional, provincial and town councillors, candidates in such offices, party leaders: [] .
    • 2011, Thomas W. Dombroski, How America Was Financed, page xi:
      This is not a historical novel yet it is in a sense historical and contained within this book is a true story of how America was financed.
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To extort ransom from.

Derived terms

edit
verbs derived from “finance”

Translations

edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also

edit

References

edit
  1. 1.0 1.1 Douglas Harper (2001–2024) “finance”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  2. ^ “finance”, in The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th edition, Boston, Mass.: Houghton Mifflin, 2000, →ISBN.
  • finance”, in OneLook Dictionary Search.
  • "finance" in the Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary (Beta Version), K Dictionaries limited, 2000-2006.

Further reading

edit

Czech

edit

Etymology

edit

Borrowed from German Finanzen.

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

finance f pl (related adjective finanční)

  1. finances

Declension

edit
edit

Further reading

edit
  • finance in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • finance in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • finance in Internetová jazyková příručka

Esperanto

edit

Adverb

edit

finance

  1. financially

French

edit

Etymology

edit

From Old French finer (to pay) + -ance.

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

finance f (plural finances)

  1. finance

Derived terms

edit

Descendants

edit
  • Danish: finans
  • Norwegian Bokmål: finans
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: finans

Further reading

edit