Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle English, late 14th century, from Old French indigence (13th century), from Latin indigentia, from indigentem, form of indigere(to need), from indu(in, within) + egere(be in need, want).[1]

Only relation to antonym affluence is common Latinate suffix +‎ -ence.

NounEdit

indigence ‎(countable and uncountable, plural indigences)

  1. extreme poverty or destitution

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ indigence” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

FrenchEdit

NounEdit

indigence f ‎(plural indigences)

  1. indigence

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin indigentia.

NounEdit

indigence f ‎(oblique plural indigences, nominative singular indigence, nominative plural indigences)

  1. indigence (poverty; lacking)

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • (fr) Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (indigence, supplement)