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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English inmost, from Old English innemest, a double superlative form from inne (within), from in (in). The modern form is due to confusion with most.

AdjectiveEdit

inmost (not comparable)

  1. The very deepest within; farthest from the surface or external part; innermost
    • 1905, Francis Lynde, A Fool for Love, The Bobbs-Merrill Company, Indianapolis, page 25:
      Virginia Carteret was finding it a new and singular experience to have a man tell her baldly at their first meeting that he had read her inmost thought of him.
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Gods of Mars[1], HTML edition, The Gutenberg Project, published 2008:
      It was as though she were attempting to read my inmost soul, …

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

inmost (plural inmosts)

  1. That which is innermost; the core.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit