See also: Core, CORE, Coré, côre, córę, çore, -core, and co-r.e.

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English core, kore, coor (apple-core, pith), of uncertain origin. Possibly of native English origin (compare Old English corn (seed", also "grain), or perhaps from Old French cuer (heart), from Latin cor (heart); or from Old French cors (body), from Latin corpus (body). Compare also Middle English colk, coke, coll (the heart or centre of an apple or onion, core), Dutch kern (core), German Kern (core). See also heart, corpse.

NounEdit

core (countable and uncountable, plural cores)

  1. In general usage, an essential part of a thing surrounded by other essential things.
    1. The central part of a fruit, containing the kernels or seeds.
      the core of an apple or quince
    2. The heart or inner part of a physical thing.
      • 2013 March 1, Nancy Langston, “Mining the Boreal North”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 2, page 98:
        Reindeer are well suited to the taiga’s frigid winters. They can maintain a thermogradient between body core and the environment of up to 100 degrees, in part because of insulation provided by their fur, and in part because of counter-current vascular heat exchange systems in their legs and nasal passages.
    3. The anatomical core, muscles which bridge abdomen and thorax.
    4. The center or inner part of a space or area.
  2. The most important part of a thing or aggregate of things wherever located and whether of any determinate location at all; the essence.
    • 2012 May 24, Nathan Rabin, “Film: Reviews: Men In Black 3”, in The Onion AV Club:
      Jones’ sad eyes betray a pervasive pain his purposefully spare dialogue only hints at, while the perfectly cast Brolin conveys hints of playfulness and warmth while staying true to the craggy stoicism at the character’s core.
    • 2018, Clarence Green; James Lambert, “Advancing disciplinary literacy through English for academic purposes: Discipline-specific wordlists, collocations and word families for eight secondary subjects”, in Journal of English for Academic Purposes, volume 35, DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jeap.2018.07.004, page 107:
      General vocabulary is often defined as a common core of English words and operationalized as the most frequent words in a balanced and representative corpus of English.
    the core of a subject
    1. A technical term for classification of things denoting those parts of a category that are most easily or most likely understood as within it.
      1. (botany) Used to designate the main and most diverse monophyletic group within a clade or taxonomic group.
      2. (game theory) The set of feasible allocations that cannot be improved upon by a subset (a coalition) of the economy's agents.
  3. particular parts of technical instruments or machines essential in function:
    1. (engineering) The portion of a mold that creates an internal cavity within a casting or that makes a hole in or through a casting.
    2. (computing, informal, historical) Ellipsis of core memory.; magnetic data storage.
    3. (computer hardware) An individual computer processor, in the sense when several processors (called cores or CPU cores) are plugged together in one single integrated circuit to work as one (called a multi-core processor).
      I wanted to play a particular computer game, which required I buy a new computer, so while the game said it needed at least a dual-core processor, I wanted my computer to be a bit ahead of the curve, so I bought a quad-core.
    4. (engineering) The material between surface materials in a structured composite sandwich material.
      a floor panel with a Nomex honeycomb core
    5. (engineering, nuclear physics) The inner part of a nuclear reactor, in which the nuclear reaction takes place.
    6. (military) The central fissile portion of a fission weapon.
      In a hollow-core design, neutrons escape from the core more readily, allowing more fissile material to be used (and thus allowing for a greater yield) while still keeping the core subcritical prior to detonation.
    7. A piece of ferromagnetic material (e.g., soft iron), inside the windings of an electromagnet, that channels the magnetic field.
    8. (printing) A hollow cylindrical piece of cardboard around which a web of paper or plastic is wound.
  4. Hence particular parts of a subject studied or examined by technical operations, likened by position and practical or structural robustness to kernels, cores in the most vulgar sense above.
    1. (medicine) A tiny sample of organic material obtained by means of a fine-needle biopsy.
    2. The bony process which forms the central axis of the horns in many animals.
    3. A disorder of sheep caused by worms in the liver.
      • 1750, William Ellis, Modern Husbandry or Practice of Farming:
        [the skin of the sheep] is clear from cores and jogs under the jaws.
    4. (biochemistry) The central part of a protein's structure, consisting mostly of hydrophobic amino acids.
    5. A cylindrical sample of rock or other materials obtained by core drilling.
    6. (physics) An atomic nucleus plus inner electrons (i.e., an atom, except for its valence electrons).
SynonymsEdit
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Terms derived from core (noun)
Related termsEdit
Terms related to core (noun)
DescendantsEdit
  • Translingual: core eudicots, core Malvales
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AdjectiveEdit

core (not comparable)

  1. Forming the most important or essential part.
    • 2009, Greg Hayes, A Practical Guide to Business Valuations for SMEs, page 68:
      Privately held businesses may hold assets or have charges to their financial statements which are not core to their main business activity.
    • 2013 June 22, “Engineers of a different kind”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8841, page 70:
      Private-equity nabobs bristle at being dubbed mere financiers. Piling debt onto companies’ balance-sheets is only a small part of what leveraged buy-outs are about, they insist. Improving the workings of the businesses they take over is just as core to their calling, if not more so. Much of their pleading is public-relations bluster.
    • 2018, Clarence Green; James Lambert, “Advancing disciplinary literacy through English for academic purposes: Discipline-specific wordlists, collocations and word families for eight secondary subjects”, in Journal of English for Academic Purposes, volume 35, DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jeap.2018.07.004, page 106:
      These lists cover important vocabulary from eight core subjects that students need to master during secondary education: Biology, Chemistry, Economics, English, Geology, History, Mathematics, and Physics.

VerbEdit

core (third-person singular simple present cores, present participle coring, simple past and past participle cored)

  1. To remove the core of an apple or other fruit.
  2. To extract a sample with a drill.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See corps

NounEdit

core (plural cores)

  1. (obsolete) A body of individuals; an assemblage.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See chore

NounEdit

core (plural cores)

  1. A miner's underground working time or shift[1].
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

From Hebrew כֹּר

NounEdit

core (plural cores)

  1. (historical units of measure) Alternative form of cor: a former Hebrew and Phoenician unit of volume.

Etymology 5Edit

Possibly an acronym for cash on return

NounEdit

core (plural cores)

  1. (automotive, machinery, aviation, marine) A deposit paid by the purchaser of a rebuilt part, to be refunded on return of a used, rebuildable part, or the returned rebuildable part itself.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 1881, Rossiter W. Raymond, A Glossary of Mining and Metallurgical Terms

AnagramsEdit


IstriotEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cor. Compare Italian cuore.

NounEdit

core

  1. heart
    • Ti son la manduleîna del mio core;
      You are the almond of my heart;

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

core

  1. Archaic form of cuore.

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

core

  1. ablative singular of coris

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unknown; derivation from either Old French cuer (heart) or cors (body) has been suggested, though both possibilities pose serious problems.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

core (plural cores)

  1. core (centre of a fruit)
  2. (rare, by extension) The middle of something.

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


NeapolitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cor. Compare Italian cuore.

NounEdit

core m (plural core)

  1. heart
    T'alluntane da stu coreYou are walking away from this heart

PortugueseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from English core.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

core m (plural cores)

  1. (computer architecture) core (independent unit in a processor with several such units)
    Synonym: núcleo

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

core

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of corar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of corar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of corar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of corar

YolaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English core.

NounEdit

core

  1. heart
    • 1867, CONGRATULATORY ADDRESS IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, line 6:
      O' core.
      Of our hearts.

ReferencesEdit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 114