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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From inspirit +‎ -ing.

VerbEdit

inspiriting

  1. present participle of inspirit

AdjectiveEdit

inspiriting (comparative more inspiriting, superlative most inspiriting)

  1. Giving impetus or spirit; animating, encouraging.
    • 1748, Samuel Richardson, Clarissa, Volume 3, Letter 41, p. 210,[1]
      I would willingly therefore write to you, if I might; the rather as it would be more inspiriting to have some end in view in what I write; some friend to please; besides merely seeking to gratify my passion for scribbling.
    • 1861, John Stuart Mill, Utilitarianism, Chapter 2[2]
      All honour to those who can abnegate for themselves the personal enjoyment of life, when by such renunciation they contribute worthily to increase the amount of happiness in the world; but he who does it, or professes to do it, for any other purpose, is no more deserving of admiration than the ascetic mounted on his pillar. He may be an inspiriting proof of what men can do, but assuredly not an example of what they should.
    • 1898, Kenneth Grahame, “Mutabile Semper” in Dream Days,[3]
      In the glorious reaction of the sunshine after the downpour, with its moist warm smells, bespanglement of greenery, and inspiriting touch of rain-washed air, the parks and palaces of the imagination glowed with a livelier iris, and their blurred beauties shone out again with fresh blush and palpitation.
    • 1974, Lawrence Durrell, Monsieur, Faber & Faber 1992, p. 220:
      These small and indeed insignificant things only began to become significant for me after the whole Vienna period which was at the same time inspiriting and depressing.