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LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From iuvō (to delight, please) +‎ -cundus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

iūcundus (feminine iūcunda, neuter iūcundum); first/second declension

  1. pleasant, agreeable, delightful, pleasing, delicious

DeclensionEdit

First/second declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative iūcundus iūcunda iūcundum iūcundī iūcundae iūcunda
Genitive iūcundī iūcundae iūcundī iūcundōrum iūcundārum iūcundōrum
Dative iūcundō iūcundae iūcundō iūcundīs iūcundīs iūcundīs
Accusative iūcundum iūcundam iūcundum iūcundōs iūcundās iūcunda
Ablative iūcundō iūcundā iūcundō iūcundīs iūcundīs iūcundīs
Vocative iūcunde iūcunda iūcundum iūcundī iūcundae iūcunda

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • jūcundus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • iucundus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • iucundus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • rest after toil is sweet: acti labores iucundi (proverb.)
    • to be in a good temper: iucunde esse (Deiot. 7. 19)
    • to be dear to some one: carum atque iucundum esse alicui