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LombardEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin iuvenem, juvenem, accusative of iuvenis (compare Catalan jove, French jeune, Galician xove, Italian giovane, Portuguese jovem, Spanish joven), from Proto-Italic *juwenis, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yuh₁en-.

PronunciationEdit

  • (eastern) IPA(key): /ˈdʒuɛn/, /ˈdʒuin/
  • (western) IPA(key): /ˈzuɛn/

AdjectiveEdit

joven m (masculine plural jóveny, feminine singular jóvena, feminine plural jóvene)

  1. young, youthful
    I mé fradeî enn jóveny.My brothers are young.
    Antonyms: vech, madur, ancian

NounEdit

joven m (masculine plural jóveny, feminine singular jóvena, feminine plural jóvene)

  1. youth, young person

PortugueseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

joven (plural jovens, comparable)

  1. Obsolete spelling of jovem

NounEdit

joven m, f (plural jovens)

  1. Obsolete spelling of jovem

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably a semi-learned term from Latin iuvenem, juvenem, accusative of iuvenis (compare Catalan jove, French jeune, Galician xove, Lombard joven, Italian giovane, Portuguese jovem), from Proto-Italic *juwenis, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yuh₁en-. The word only appears relatively late in Spanish literature, around the early 17th century, and before that, in Medieval and Golden Age Spanish the word mozo was always used. Furthermore, phonetically, the expected result in Spanish would be *jone[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈxoben/, [ˈxoβẽn]
  • Hyphenation: jo‧ven

AdjectiveEdit

joven (plural jóvenes) (superlative jovencísimo)

  1. young, youthful
    Mis tías son jóvenes.My aunts are young.
    Synonym: juvenil
    Antonyms: anciano, maduro, viejo

NounEdit

joven m or f (plural jóvenes)

  1. youth, young person
    Synonyms: muchacho, muchacha

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit