See also: Mozo, mōzõ, možo, and móžo

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish mozo.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈməʊzəʊ/, /ˈmoθo/

NounEdit

mozo (plural mozos)

  1. A male servant, especially an attendant to a bullfighter.
    • 1992, Cormac McCarthy, All the Pretty Horses:
      When he rode up to the gerente’s house that morning he was accompanied by four friends and by a retinue of mozos and two packanimals saddled with hardwood kiacks, one empty, the other carrying their noon provisions.
  2. A title of respect for a young man (usually unmarried) with or without a name used. (The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought:)
  3. An unmarried man, a boy. (The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought:)

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mozo

  1. neuter of mozu

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese moço (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria) of unknown origin. Cognate with Portuguese moço, Asturian mozu, and Spanish mozo.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmoθo̝/, (western) /ˈmoso̝/

NounEdit

mozo m (plural mozos, feminine moza, feminine plural mozas)

  1. boy; teenager; young man; single man
    Synonyms: homiño, rapaz
  2. boyfriend
    Xa é unha mulleriña; mesmo botou mozo.
    She's already a young lady; she even has a boyfriend now.
    Synonym: noivo
  3. (archaic) junior (person that is younger than other person)
    • 1485, M. Lucas Álvarez and P. Lucas Domínguez (eds.), El monasterio de San Clodio do Ribeiro en la Edad Media: estudio y documentos. Sada: Edicións do Castro, page 709:
      Vasco d'Oseve o mozo, fillo de Vasco d'Oseve o vello
      Vasco de Oseve junior, son of Vasco de Oseve senior

Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mozo m (feminine singular moza, masculine plural mozos, feminine plural mozas)

  1. young; younger
    Alá foron os anos mozos!
    The young years are over!

ReferencesEdit

  • moço” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • moço” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • mozo” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • mozo” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • mozo” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

PotawatomiEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

mozo

  1. moose

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


SpanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Uncertain origin, probably ultimately identical with muchacho (cf. mocho), or from Latin musteus (must-like, of new wine, fresh), from musteum, from mustum. Other theories include a pre-Roman origin. Compare Portuguese moço, Galician mozo, Asturian mozu. Cf. also Catalan mosso (taken from Spanish) and motxo. There may alternatively be a link to Italian mozzo (cut off, docked), French mousse (blunt), or Basque motz.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /ˈmoθo/, [ˈmo.θo]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /ˈmoso/, [ˈmo.so]

NounEdit

mozo m (plural mozos, feminine moza, feminine plural mozas)

  1. boy, lad, young man, youth
  2. servant, helper, steward, manservant
  3. (Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Peru) waiter, server
    Synonym: camarero
  4. cat, tomcat

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Catalan: mosso
  • Italian: mozzo
  • Yosondúa Mixtec: musu

AdjectiveEdit

mozo (feminine moza, masculine plural mozos, feminine plural mozas)

  1. young, youthful
  2. unmarried

Further readingEdit