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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

knicker (uncountable)

  1. (used attributively as a modifier) Of or relating to knickers.
    knicker elastic, knicker drawer, knicker thief
    A knicker nicker nicked a pair of knickers off the clothesline.
  2. knickerbockers
    • 1983, David Lanier Lewis, ‎Laurence Goldstein, The Automobile and American Culture (page 58)
      Country club men had reinstated the knicker, adding four inches in length []
    • 1925, The Clothier and Furnisher (volume 106, page 79)
      A sock worn in the regulation fashion, under the knicker, looks neatest and permits the proper full flare of the knicker.

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch knikker.

NounEdit

knicker (plural knickers)

  1. (dated, dialect, Britain, US) A small ball of clay, baked hard and oiled, used as a marble in games.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bartlett to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for knicker in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

knicker m (plural knickers)

  1. Alternative spelling of knickers; knickerbockers

Further readingEdit