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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French lection, from Latin lēctiōnem, form of lēctiō, from legō (I read, I gather). Doublet of lesson.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lection (countable and uncountable, plural lections)

  1. (obsolete) The act of reading.
  2. (ecclesiastical) A reading of a religious text; a lesson to be read in church etc.
    • 1885, Richard Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night, Night 13:
      This man [] came to dwell in our city, and here founded this holy house, and he hath edified us by his litanies and his lections of the Koran.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


InterlinguaEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lection (plural lectiones)

  1. lesson

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin lectio, lectionem. See also leçon.

NounEdit

lection f (oblique plural lections, nominative singular lection, nominative plural lections)

  1. election; choice
  2. reading (act, process of reading)

DescendantsEdit