DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German martern (to torment), derived from Marter (torture), borrowed via Late Latin martyrium (martyrdom) from Ancient Greek μαρτύριον (martúrion, testimony).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

martre (imperative martr, infinitive at martre, present tense martrer, past tense martrede, perfect tense har martret)

  1. to torment

InflectionEdit


FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

From Frankish *marþra (marten), from Proto-Germanic *marþuz, from Proto-Indo-European *martus (bride). X. Delamarre (2003) in Dictionnaire de la langue gauloise proposes a connection to Gaulish martalos via a "crossed-etymology".

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /maʁtʁ/
  • (file)

NounEdit

 
une marte

martre f (plural martres)

  1. marten (animal)
    Synonym: marte

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈmaɐ̯tʁə], [ˈmaʁtʁə]
  • (file)

VerbEdit

martre

  1. inflection of martern:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Frankish *martar.

NounEdit

martre f (plural martres)

  1. (Jersey) marten (animal)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a Middle Low German cognate to Middle High German martern, marteren (torture).

VerbEdit

martre (present tense martrer, past tense martra or martret, past participle martra or martret)

  1. (mental/spiritual) torment

ReferencesEdit