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EtymologyEdit

From Latin meditatus, past participle of meditari (to think or reflect upon, consider, design, purpose, intend), in form as if frequentative of mederi (to heal, to cure, to remedy); in sense and in form near to Greek μελετῶ (meletô, to care for, attend to, study, practise, etc.)

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

meditate (third-person singular simple present meditates, present participle meditating, simple past and past participle meditated)

  1. (intransitive) To contemplate; to keep the mind fixed upon something; to study.
  2. (intransitive) To sit or lie down and come to a deep rest while still remaining conscious.
  3. (transitive) To consider; to reflect on.
    • 1761, John Toland, The Life Of Iohn[sic] Milton
      [] yet I can by no means be persuaded that he could find leisure enough to write so many copies of it in his solitudes and sufferings, in the midst of treaties, in the hurry of removals, while he meditated his escape, and was strictly observ'd by his guards.

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TranslationsEdit

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ParticipleEdit

meditāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of meditātus

ReferencesEdit