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InterlinguaEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

melior

  1. (comparative degree of bon) better

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *mélyōs, from *mel- ‎(strong, big). Cognate with multus, Ancient Greek μάλα ‎(mála), Latvian milns ‎(very much, a lot of).

AdjectiveEdit

melior ‎(comparative of bonus)

  1. better; irregular comparative degree of bonus, good

InflectionEdit

Third declension, comparative variant

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
nominative melior melius meliōrēs meliōra
genitive meliōris meliōrum
dative meliōrī meliōribus
accusative meliōrem melius meliōrēs meliōra
ablative meliōre meliōribus
vocative melior melius meliōrēs meliōra

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • melior in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • melior in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • melior in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to find one's circumstances altered for the better (the worse): meliore (deteriore) condicione esse, uti
    • my position is considerably improved; my prospects are brighter: res meae meliore loco, in meliore causa sunt
    • my position is considerably improved; my prospects are brighter: meliorem in statum redigor
    • to hope well of a person: bene, optime (meliora) sperare de aliquo (Nep. Milt. 1. 1)
    • to induce some one to take a brighter view of things: in meliorem spem, cogitationem aliquem inducere (Off. 2. 15. 53)
    • heaven forfend: di prohibeant, di meliora!
    • (ambiguous) he feels better: melius ei factum est
    • (ambiguous) to deserve well at some one's hands; to do a service to..: bene, praeclare (melius, optime) mereri de aliquo
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